Abstract

Abstract:

This article proposes that Shakespeare uses twinship and marriage in The Comedy of Errors to reflect on the importance of individuality and interrelation in the formation of identity. Specifically, this article shows how The Comedy of Errors sets the twin relation against the marital relation, ultimately implying that marriage—imperfect, everyday marriage—has as much subjective impact as the extraordinary bond between identical twins. As amazing as it might be to see two persons sharing "one face, one voice, one habit," The Comedy of Errors suggests that the twin relation does not surpass in significance the equally marvelous relation whereby husband and wife become "one flesh."

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Additional Information

ISSN
1522-9270
Print ISSN
0039-3657
Pages
pp. 277-298
Launched on MUSE
2020-07-02
Open Access
No
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