Abstract

Abstract:

This article argues that The Spanish Tragedy's treatment of grief is inspired by classical forensic rhetoric, the guidelines for which demand the self-inculcation of emotion in the service of persuasion. Of particular interest is book 6 of Quintilian's The Orator's Education, which presents paternal grief for a dead son as a topos for imitation and inspiration, along with a number of courtroom practices that shape Thomas Kyd's presentation of Hieronimo. I suggest that Kyd drew on Quintilian in order to authorize his play, in part by positioning it as the rightful inheritor of the classical tradition accessed through the emotions.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1522-9270
Print ISSN
0039-3657
Pages
pp. 209-228
Launched on MUSE
2020-07-02
Open Access
No
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