Abstract

Between 1910 and 1930 entertainment journalism in middle-class Canadian magazines was shifting. By tracing the representations of theater and film in two of Canada’s most popular magazines, MacLean’s and Everywoman’s World, this article demonstrates the relative attention devoted to each field and how particular forms and styles for their representation emerged and changed. The combined statistical data and discursive analysis reveals the extent to which Canadians were presumed to be interested in theater stars and the relatively quick redirection of interest to the cinema in general (and a handful of stars in particular) and the visual forms of representation that this turn inspired.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2152-9272
Print ISSN
1947-6574
Pages
pp. 96-120
Launched on MUSE
2017-07-10
Open Access
No
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