We cannot verify your location

Shibboleth authentication is only available to registered institutions.

Project MUSE

Browse Book and Journal Content on Project MUSE

Browse Results For:

Library Science and Publishing > Library and Information Science

1 2 3 NEXT next

Results 1-10 of 23

The Atlas of New Librarianship Cover

Access Restricted This search result is for a Book

The Atlas of New Librarianship

R. David Lankes

An essential guide to a librarianship based not on books and artifacts but on knowledge and learning.

Books, Bibliographies, and Pugs Cover

Access Restricted This search result is for a Book

Books, Bibliographies, and Pugs

A Festschrift to Honor Murlin Croucher

edited by

Access Restricted This search result is for a Journal

Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science

Vol. 34 (2010) through current issue

A respected source of the most up-to-date research on library and information science, The Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science is recognized internationally for its authoritative bilingual contributions to the field of information science. Established in 1976, the journal is produced by CAIS/ACSI and is dedicated to the publication of research findings, both in full-length and in brief format; reviews of books; software and technology; and letters to the editor.

The editorial policy of the journal is to continue the advancement of information and library science in both English and French Canada by serving as a forum for discussion of theory and research.

The journal is concerned with research findings, understanding the issues in the field, and understanding the history, economics, technology, and human behaviour of information library systems and services.

Classification des documents numériques dans les organismes Cover

Access Restricted This search result is for a Book

Classification des documents numériques dans les organismes

Impact des pratiques classificatoires personnelles sur le repérage

Peu d’employés utilisent le schéma de classifica¬tion institutionnel pour organiser les documents numériques se trouvant sur leur poste de travail. La plupart privilégient des systèmes de classification plus « personnels » qui répondent davantage à leurs besoins quotidiens qu’à la vision de leur milieu de travail. La mémoire institutionnelle est-elle mise en péril par cette autogestion ? Aucune recherche n’avait été menée à ce jour afin de vérifier dans quelle mesure les schémas de classification personnels permettent, sinon facilitent, le repérage des documents numériques par des tiers, dans le cadre d’un travail collaboratif par exemple ou lorsqu’il s’agit de reconstituer un dossier. Après avoir présenté les assises théoriques de la classification documentaire et de la classification archivistique, l’auteure présente les caractéristiques d’une vingtaine de modèles de classification personnels. Elle expose ensuite les résultats d’une simulation réalisée dans un environnement contrôlé vérifiant l’efficacité du repérage selon ces modèles. Unique ouvrage à aborder l’étude de la classification en milieu de travail, il sera particulièrement utile aux responsables de la gestion de l’information qui ont à concevoir et mettre à jour des plans de classification tant sur support papier que dans un contexte numérique, de même qu’aux étudiants en gestion de l’information.

Culture Club Cover

Access Restricted This search result is for a Book

Culture Club

The Curious History of the Boston Athenaeum

Katherine Wolff

Founded in 1807, the successor to a literary club called the Anthology Society, the Boston Athenaeum occupies an important place in the early history of American intellectual life. At first a repository for books, to which works of art were later added, the Athenaeum attracted over time a following that included such literary luminaries as Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry James. Yet from the outset, Katherine Wolff shows, the Boston Athenaeum was more than a library; it was also a breeding ground for evolving notions of cultural authority and American identity. Though governed by the Boston elite, who promoted it as a way of strengthening their own clout in the city, the early Athenaeum reflected conflicting and at times contradictory aims and motives on the part of its membership. On the one hand, by drawing on European aesthetic models to reinforce an exalted sense of mission, Athenaeum leaders sought to establish themselves as guardians of a nascent American culture. On the other, they struggled to balance their goals with their concerns about an increasingly democratic urban populace. As the Boston Athenaeum opened its doors to women as well as men outside its inner circle, it eventually began to define itself against a more accessible literary institution, the Boston Public Library. Told through a series of provocative episodes and generously illustrated, Culture Club offers a more complete picture than previously available of the cultural politics behind the making of a quintessentially American institution.

Data Information Literacy Cover

Access Restricted This search result is for a Book

Data Information Literacy

Librarians, Data and the Education of a New Generation of Researchers

by Jake Carlson and Lisa Johnston

Given the increasing attention to managing, publishing, and preserving research datasets as scholarly assets, what competencies in working with research data will graduate students in STEM disciplines need to be successful in their fields? And what role can librarians play in helping students attain these competencies? In addressing these questions, this book articulates a new area of opportunity for librarians and other information professionals, developing educational programs that introduce graduate students to the knowledge and skills needed to work with research data. The term “data information literacy” has been adopted with the deliberate intent of tying two emerging roles for librarians together. By viewing information literacy and data services as complementary rather than separate activities, the contributors seek to leverage the progress made and the lessons learned in each service area. The intent of the publication is to help librarians cultivate strategies and approaches for developing data information literacy programs of their own using the work done in the multiyear, IMLS-supported Data Information Literacy (DIL) project as real-world case studies. The initial chapters introduce the concepts and ideas behind data information literacy, such as the twelve data competencies. The middle chapters describe five case studies in data information literacy conducted at different institutions (Cornell, Purdue, Minnesota, Oregon), each focused on a different disciplinary area in science and engineering. They detail the approaches taken, how the programs were implemented, and the assessment metrics used to evaluate their impact. The later chapters include the “DIL Toolkit,” a distillation of the lessons learned, which is presented as a handbook for librarians interested in developing their own DIL programs. The book concludes with recommendations for future directions and growth of data information literacy. More information about the DIL project can be found on the project’s website: datainfolit.org.

Digital Critical Editions Cover

Access Restricted This search result is for a Book

Digital Critical Editions

Daniel Apollon

Provocative yet sober, Digital Critical Editions examines how transitioning from print to a digital milieu deeply affects how scholars deal with the work of editing critical texts. On one hand, forces like changing technology and evolving reader expectations lead to the development of specific editorial products, while on the other hand, they threaten traditional forms of knowledge and methods of textual scholarship.Using the experiences of philologists, text critics, text encoders, scientific editors, and media analysts, Digital Critical Editions ranges from philology in ancient Alexandria to the vision of user-supported online critical editing, from peer-directed texts distributed to a few to community-edited products shaped by the many. The authors discuss the production and accessibility of documents, the emergence of tools used in scholarly work, new editing regimes, and how the readers' expectations evolve as they navigate digital texts. The goal: exploring questions such as, What kind of text is produced? Why is it produced in this particular way?Digital Critical Editions provides digital editors, researchers, readers, and technological actors with insights for addressing disruptions that arise from the clash of traditional and digital cultures, while also offering a practical roadmap for processing traditional texts and collections with today's state-of-the-art editing and research techniques thus addressing readers' new emerging reading habits.

The Importance of Being Earnest Cover

Access Restricted This search result is for a Book

The Importance of Being Earnest

Charleston Conference Proceedings, 2014

Over one hundred presentations from the thirty-fourth Charleston Library Conference (held November 5–8, 2014) are included in this annual proceedings volume. Major themes of the meeting included patron-driven acquisitions versus librarian-driven acquisitions; marketing library resources to faculty and students to increase use; measuring and demonstrating the library's role and impact in the retention of students and faculty; the desirability of textbook purchasing by the library; changes in workflows necessitated by the move to virtual collections; the importance of self-publishing and open access publishing as a collection strategy; the hybrid publisher and the hybrid author; the library’s role in the collection of data, datasets, and data curation; and data-driven decision making. While the Charleston meeting remains a core one for acquisitions, serials, and collection development librarians in dialog with publishers and vendors, the breadth of coverage of this volume reflects the fact that the Charleston Conference is now one of the major venues for leaders in the information community to shape strategy and prepare for the future. Over 1,600 delegates attended the 2014 meeting, ranging from the staff of small public library systems to CEOs of major corporations. This fully indexed, copyedited volume provides a rich source for the latest evidence-based research and lessons from practice in a range of information science fields. The contributors are leaders in the library, publishing, and vendor communities.

Indexing It All Cover

Access Restricted This search result is for a Book

Indexing It All

The Subject in the Age of Documentation, Information, and Data

Ronald E. Day

In this book, Ronald Day offers a critical history of the modern tradition of documentation. Focusing on the documentary index (understood as a mode of social positioning), and drawing on the work of the French documentalist Suzanne Briet, Day explores the understanding and uses of indexicality. He examines the transition as indexes went from being explicit professional structures that mediated users and documents to being implicit infrastructural devices used in everyday information and communication acts. Doing so, he also traces three epistemic eras in the representation of individuals and groups, first in the forms of documents, then information, then data. Day investigates five cases from the modern tradition of documentation. He considers the socio-technical instrumentalism of Paul Otlet, "the father of European documentation" (contrasting it to the hermeneutic perspective of Martin Heidegger); the shift from documentation to information science and the accompanying transformation of persons and texts into users and information; social media's use of algorithms, further subsuming persons and texts; attempts to build android robots--to embody human agency within an information system that resembles a human being; and social "big data" as a technique of neoliberal governance that employs indexing and analytics for purposes of surveillance. Finally, Day considers the status of critique and judgment at a time when people and their rights of judgment are increasingly mediated, displaced, and replaced by modern documentary techniques.

Access Restricted This search result is for a Journal

Information & Culture: A Journal of History

Vol. 36 (2001) through current issue

Formerly Libraries & Culture, through volume 41, no. 2, Spring 2006 (E-ISSN: 1534-7591, Print ISSN: 0894-8631).

Information and Culture: A Journal of History explores the interactions of people, organizations, and societies with information and technologies. Social and cultural context of information and information technology, viewed from an historical perspective, is at the heart of the journal's interests.

1 2 3 NEXT next

Results 1-10 of 23


Return to Browse All on Project MUSE

Research Areas

Content Type

  • (19)
  • (4)


  • You have access to this content
  • Free sample
  • Open Access
  • Restricted Access