Cover

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Frontmatter

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Table of Contents

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Series Preface

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pp. ix-xii

The New Hong Kong Cinema came into existence under very special circumstances, during a period of social and political crisis resulting in a change of cultural paradigms. Such critical moments have produced the cinematic achievements of the early Soviet cinema, neorealism, the nouvelle vague, the German cinema in the 1970s ...

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Acknowledgements

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pp. xiii-xvi

The genesis of this book can be traced back to a moment of illumination. The familiar images of Hong Kong’s public housing estates in Fruit Chan’s Made in Hong Kong struck me as personal and spectral. They recalled childhood memories of residing in such grassroots locales. The moving resonances in these forgotten spaces ...

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1. Introduction: History beyond the Death Trips

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pp. 1-20

A typical story of disaffected youth and the morbid trips they take, Made in Hong Kong (1997) narrates the tale of four youngsters coming from the lower sector of Hong Kong society. Moon (Zhongqiu/Chung-chau), Ping (Ping/Ping), Sylvester (Long/Lung), and Susan (Shan/San) are all subject to the cruel realities of life in ...

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2. Authenticity and Independence: Fruit Chan and Independent Filmmaking

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pp. 21-38

Independent and experimental filmmaking has existed for many decades. However, as independent filmmaker Bryan Chang claims, there has never been such a film movement in Hong Kong, no matter how politically conscious and cosmopolitan its filmmakers have been.2 In their slightly different periodizations of Hong Kong ...

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3. There Are Many Ways to Be Realistic

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pp. 39-52

Although the impossibility of obtaining absolute independence is our ontological condition, we can identify “independent motivations” in specific historical times — the moral incentive to search for independence within constraints. Elsewhere I have described these historical disjunctures as “moments of danger,”...

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4. The Art of D

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pp. 53-78

Culture is an ongoing process of renewal and negation. In his discussion of hegemony and structures of feeling, Raymond Williams outlines a relation between the dominant and the residual, and between the dominant and the emergent. In both cases, the relation of emergent and residual cultural formations to the ...

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5. In Search of the Ghostly in Context

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pp. 79-100

Made in Hong Kong demonstrates a dual moment of defamiliarization. The previous chapter described how realistic motivations were mobilized to shatter the myths and ideologies inherent in the dominant, commercial genre. Realism as a style in Fruit Chan’s other films clearly embodies an alternative vision to ...

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6. In Search of the Ghostly in Urban Spaces*

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pp. 101-124

The notion of the “ghostly city” in Fruit Chan’s films is not a literal reference to actual ghosts; the emphasis is more on the exploration of homelessness. With reference to recent scholarship on emotion, the feeling of homelessness in Made in Hong Kong can be traced to the 1997 handover and the longer-term socio-economic

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7. Epilogue: Grassrooting Cinematic Practices

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pp. 125-128

Within a short span of ten years, Fruit Chan has produced an ensemble of films with his own signature style. Motivated by the intention to pursue independence and authenticity, he has shown us how auteurism and creativity have interacted to produce films of immense social and cultural significance. From his energetic and ...

Appendix 1. Interview with Fruit Chan

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pp. 129-144

Appendix 2. Funding Sources and Awards

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pp. 145-150

Notes

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pp. 151-166

Credits

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pp. 167-170

Bibliography

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pp. 171-178