In this Book

summary

The eighteenth century has generally been understood as the Age of Print, when the new medium revolutionized the literary world and rendered manuscript culture obsolete. After Print, however, reveals that the story isn’t so simple. Manuscript remained a vital, effective, and even preferred forum for professional and amateur authors working across fields such as literature, science, politics, religion, and business through the Romantic period.

The contributors to this book offer a survey of the manuscript culture of the time, discussing handwritten culinary recipes, the poetry of John Keats, Benjamin Franklin’s letters about his electrical experiments, and more. Collectively, the essays demonstrate that what has often been seen as the amateur, feminine, and aristocratic world of handwritten exchange thrived despite the spread of the printed word. In so doing, they undermine the standard print-manuscript binary and advocate for a critical stance that better understands the important relationship between the media.

Bringing together work from literary scholars, librarians, and digital humanists, the diverse essays in After Print offer a new model for archival research, pulling from an exciting variety of fields to demonstrate that manuscript culture did not die out but, rather, may have been revitalized by the advent of printing.

Contributors: Leith Davis, Simon Fraser University * Margaret J. M. Ezell, Texas A&M University * Emily C. Friedman, Auburn University * Kathryn R. King, University of Montevallo * Michelle Levy, Simon Fraser University * Marissa Nicosia, Penn State Abington * Philip S. Palmer, Morgan Library and Museum * Colin T. Ramsey, Appalachian State University * Brian Rejack, Illinois State University * Beth Fowkes Tobin, University of Georgia * Andrew O. Winckles, Adrian College

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Half-Title Page, Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. i-iv
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  1. Table of Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. vii-x
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  1. Introduction: The Multimedia Eighteenth Century
  2. pp. 1-24
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  1. Part I — Coteries, Communities, Collaborations: Manuscript Publication
  1. 1 — “Pray for the Unworthy Scribbler”: The Textual Cultures of Early Methodist Women
  2. Andrew O. Winckles
  3. pp. 27-51
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  1. 2 — Collecting John Abbot’s Natural History Notes and Drawings
  2. Beth Fowkes Tobin
  3. pp. 52-73
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  1. 3 - A “Female Accomplishment”?: Femininity, Privacy, and Eighteenth-Century Letter-Writing Norms
  2. Rachael Scarborough King
  3. pp. 74-94
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  1. 4 — Bookmaking and Archiving in Dorothy Wordsworth’s Notebooks
  2. Michelle Levy
  3. pp. 95-120
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  1. Part II — The Manuscript-Print Interface
  1. 5 — Paratextual Readers: Manuscript Verse in Printed Books of the Long Eighteenth Century
  2. Philip S. Palmer
  3. pp. 123-147
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  1. 6 — Mediating the “Sudden & Surprising Revolution”: Official Manuscript Newsletters and the Revolution of 1688
  2. Leith Davis
  3. pp. 148-174
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  1. 7 — Manuscript, Print, and the Affective Turn: The Case of Frances Brooke’s The Old Maid
  2. Kathryn R. King
  3. pp. 175-194
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  1. 8 — Becoming Dr. Franklin: Benjamin Franklin’s Science, Manuscript Circulation, and “Anti-Authorship” in Print
  2. Colin T. Ramsey
  3. pp. 195-214
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  1. Part III—New Methods for Manuscript Studies
  1. 9 — Amateur Manuscript Fiction in the Archives: An Introduction
  2. Emily C. Friedman
  3. pp. 217-236
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  1. 10 — The Language of Notation and the Space of Manuscript Notebooks
  2. Collin Jennings
  3. pp. 237-262
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  1. 11 — The Circulation of John Keats’s Letters on Land, on Sea, Online
  2. Brian Rejack
  3. pp. 263-284
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  1. 12 — Cooking Hannah Woolley’s Printed Recipes from a Manuscript Recipe Book: UPenn Ms. Codex 785
  2. Marissa Nicosia
  3. pp. 285-309
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  1. Epilogue
  2. Margaret J. M. Ezell
  3. pp. 310-320
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 321-324
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 325-340
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Additional Information

ISBN
9780813943497
MARC Record
OCLC
1137736798
Pages
350
Launched on MUSE
2020-03-04
Language
English
Open Access
No
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