In this Book

summary
Diagnosing Madness is a study of the linguistic negotiations at the heart of mental illness identification and patient diagnosis. Through an examination of individual psychiatric case records from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Cristina Hanganu-Bresch and Carol Berkenkotter show how the work of psychiatry was navigated by patients, families, doctors, the general public, and the legal system. The results of examining those involved and their interactions show that the psychiatrist's task became one of constant persuasion, producing arguments surrounding diagnosis and asylum confinement that attempted to reconcile shifting definitions of disease and to respond to sociocultural pressures. By studying patient cases, the emerging literature of confinement, and patient accounts viewed alongside institutional records, the authors trace the evolving rhetoric of psychiatric disease, its impact on the treatment of patients, its implications for our contemporary understanding of mental illness, and the identity of the psychiatric patient. Diagnosing Madness helps elucidate the larger rhetorical forces that contributed to the eventual decline of the asylum and highlights the struggle for the professionalization of psychiatry.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
  2. pp. i-vi
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Contents
  2. p. vii
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. List of Illustrations
  2. p. viii
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Series Editor's Preface
  2. Thomas W. Benson
  3. pp. ix-x
  4. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Preface
  2. Cristina Hanganu-Bresch
  3. pp. xi-xii
  4. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Introduction: Diagnosing Madness—Imagining the Psychiatric Patient, 1850–1920
  2. pp. 1-8
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Chapter 1. The Patient as a Psychiatric and Legal Subject in Nineteenth-Century America: Between Norm and Normal
  2. pp. 9-34
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Chapter 2. Wrongful Confinement in Late Nineteenth-Century Fiction: Sensation, Fact, Public Fear, and Compound Rhetorical Situations
  2. pp. 35-55
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Chapter 3. From Admissions Records to Case Notes: The Illocutionary Power of Occult Genres
  2. pp. 56-78
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Chapter 4. Narrative Survival: Personal and Institutional Accounts of Asylum Confinement
  2. pp. 79-102
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Chapter 5. Symptoms in Search of a Concept: A Case Study in Psychiatric Enregisterment
  2. pp. 103-130
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Conclusion
  2. pp. 131-138
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Appendix 1 Henrietta Unwin’s Medical Certificates and Case Note Excerpts from Her 1866 and 1867 Ticehurst Hospitalizations
  2. pp. 139-144
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Appendix 2 List of Baldwin’s Hospitalizations at Ticehurst
  2. pp. 145-146
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Notes
  2. pp. 147-162
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 163-172
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Index
  2. pp. 173-180
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents

Additional Information

ISBN
9781643360263
Related ISBN
9781643360256
MARC Record
OCLC
1088670359
Pages
192
Launched on MUSE
2019-08-15
Language
English
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.