Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

Completing this book would not have been possible without the initial support and motivation of David Lenson, Edwin Gentzler, Jose N. Ornelas, and Angel Rivera. As the manuscript took on new directions, I was extremely fortunate to have the intellectual and moral support of Antonia Carcelén-Estrada, Tara Daly, and Sara Ceroni. Thank you for your encouraging words and patience along the way. At the College of the Holy Cross, my colleagues in the Department of Spanish have been very...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-18

As two key authors deeply engaged in the production, exchange, and circulation of literature produced in the context of post-1959 Latin America, Roberto Fernández Retamar and Mario Benedetti agree upon the centrality, originality, and truly unprecedented global reach of Latin American letters of this period, albeit from slightly different perspectives. Even by acknowledging the undeniable importance and contributions of authors such as José Martí, Rubén Darío, César Vallejo, Gabriela Mistral, Jorge...

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1. Sensing Otherwise

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pp. 19-38

Sensing and thinking about the past can easily fall prey to the power of nostalgia. It is in this light that Boym’s words become a critical invitation to rethink how we treat cultural texts from the past and the place we assign them within our cultural canon today. By drawing attention to “our cultural canon,” the intention here is not to rekindle or rehearse debates about which texts edify a shared laundry list of cultural artifacts closely...

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2. The Poetics of Sensing: Decolonial Verses in Antipoetry and Conversational Poetry

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pp. 39-91

Following Fernández Retamar’s critical suggestion that literature is at once rooted within its time and also exists in relation to literature writ large, one of the goals of this chapter is to establish points of connection and correlation among four distinct and even fragmentary approaches to using vernacular language to write poetry, specifically in examples drawn from Nicanor Parra, Mario Benedetti, Ernesto Cardenal, and Roque Dalton. A second issue that I seek to address is poetry’s contribution to a...

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3. Decolonial Sounds: Redolent Echoes of Nueva Canción

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pp. 92-141

The poetic figures of Nicanor Parra and Mario Benedetti appear as two connecting threads between the type of poetic production discussed in the previous chapter and a specific type of popular music that appeared during the same period. In the case of Nicanor, his indirect contribution to the development of nueva canción has to do with encouraging his sister, Violeta, to conduct research in remote areas of Chile as a way for her to compile folk music and traditions that were rapidly disappearing and had...

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4. Decolonial Visuality and New Latin American Cinema

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pp. 142-186

In the concluding words to his coedited volume Empires of Vision (2014), Martin Jay reminds us that integral to the multilayered forms of imperialism are the uses of vision, visuality, and “the visual to achieve its ends. The spectacle of imperialism is always a screen behind which a far less attractive process unfolds. Although resistance to that process also can draw on visual practices, it too is never predominantly an affair of the eye or the gaze” ( Jay 618). In making these remarks, Jay is aware that the visual was...

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5. Decolonial Aesthetics in Latin America

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pp. 187-212

Throughout this book, my theorization of decolonial aesthetics has been grounded upon a need to revisit seemingly dissimilar and disjointed socalled “populist” artistic expressions, some of which failed to receive much critical recognition in their time, while others have become part of the canon of cultural texts that get taught and written about in academic circles. Precisely due to their alleged “populist” agenda and presumed alignment with Marxist, communist, or socialist ideologies, the...

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Conclusion: Sensing the Irresolute Past in the Present

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pp. 213-222

In Fanon’s seminal study of the modalities of colonial violence, he argues that in a colonized world, it is education, particularly in relation to “aesthetic forms of the status quo,” that helps to maintain divisions at all levels of society. Fanon writes, “In capitalist societies, education, whether secular or religious, the teaching of moral reflexes handed down from father to son, the exemplary integrity of workers decorated after fifty years of loyal and faithful service, the fostering of love for harmony and wisdom,...

Notes

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pp. 223-234

Works Cited

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pp. 235-250

Index

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pp. 251-256