Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

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Abstract

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p. v

In 1951, musician Kenneth Peacock (1922–2000) secured a contract from the National Museum of Canada (today the Canadian Museum of History) to collect folk songs in Newfoundland. As the province had recently joined Confederation, the project was deemed a goodwill gesture, while at the same time adding to the museum’s meagre anglophone archival collections. Between 1951 and 1961, over the course of six field visits, Peacock collected 766 songs and melodies from 118 singers in 38 communities, later publishing two-thirds of this material in a three-volume collection Songs of the Newfoundland Outports...

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Résumé

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p. vi

En 1951, le musicien Kenneth Peacock (1922-2000) a signé un contrat avec le Musée national du Canada, qui porte aujourd’hui le nom de Musée canadien de l’histoire, pour créer un recueil de chansons folk terre-neuviennes. Comme l’entrée de la province dans la Confédération remontait à deux années seulement, le projet a été considéré comme un geste de bonne volonté, mais aussi comme un ajout important à la collection d’archives anglophones du musée, encore mince à l’époque. Entre 1951 et 1961, Peacock a recueilli 766 chansons et mélodies de 118 chanteurs provenant de 38 communautés différentes au...

Dedication

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pp. vii-viii

Table of Contents

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pp. ix-xiv

List of Figures

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pp. xv-xvi

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Acknowledgements

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pp. xvii-xx

The idea for The Forgotten Songs of the Newfoundland Outports emerged during the summer of 1997, while I was in the midst of completing my doctoral program. At the time I happened to be screening Kenneth Peacock’s Newfoundland field tapes as a means of reconciling what he had collected with what he eventually published in his three-volume collection Songs of the Newfoundland Outports (1965). One afternoon I encountered Peacock’s recording of Everett Bennett of St. Paul’s performing the comic music hall song “Goodbye John, But Don’t Stop Long.” (PEA 98 No. 766). As Peacock was more interested in presenting...

Abbreviations

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pp. xxi-xxii

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Introduction

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pp. 1-16

In 1995, I received a letter from the classical composer and folk song collector Kenneth Peacock (1922–2000), in response to a folk-song project I had undertaken pertaining to his three-volume work Songs of the Newfoundland Outports (1965). At the time, although his publication was considered to be a bible for singers, and a significant resource for researchers, little was known about the man himself and how he came to assemble such a collection. That correspondence, filled with reminiscences, opened the door for what would become the subject of my doctorial dissertation, a book, and several articles (Guigné, 2002; 2003; 2004a; 2007; 2008a). Peacock notes:...

The Forgotten Songs Of the Newfoundland Outports Taken From Kenneth Peacock’s Newfoundland Field Collection, 1951–1961

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Angelina Brown

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pp. 19-21

The fourth stanza consists of three phrases. Hulan starts on bar two and sings the remainder of the first phrase up to bar five. He skips bars six to nine, picking up the song again at bar ten to the end of the song.

Roud No. 24933

This somewhat fragmented comic song, composed by G.W. Hunt (1839-1904), is one of the few that Peacock chose not to transcribe. The textual and musical transcriptions and comments on the music presented here are based entirely on Osborne’s transcription of...

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Anna Gray

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pp. 22-25

As the field recording reveals, Annie Walters forgot the first couple of lines of stanza five. She resumes singing the song on the third phrase.

Roud No. 24031

Field recordings of “Anna Gray,” also known as “Annie Gray” or “Annie Grey,” appear to be rare. Folklorists Herbert Halpert and John Widdowson visited Annie Walters in 1966, at that time also collecting“Anna Grey”from her (MUNFLA, STI, Acc.66-24/C288).Hamish Henderson also recorded a version in 1952 from the singing of Willie Mathieson of Ellon,...

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Annie Dear I’m Called Away

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pp. 26-27

This late Victorian song is known variously as “Goodbye Annie,” “Annie Dear I’m called Away,” “Goodbye Annie, Beneath a Cottage,” “Goodbye Maggie,” and “Goodbye Darling, Called Way (Goodbye Maggie).” Lyricist Harry Hunter (1841–1906) and composer John Guest originally contrived “Annie Dear I’m Called Away” for the urban mass audiences attending the British music halls and minstrel shows (Hunter and Guest, [1873]).

Hunter’s music is an “example of the cross-fertilization of music hall and minstrelsy” (Pickering, 1999: 75). He likely composed the song sometime between 1870 and 1873 for...

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As Susan Strayed the Briny Beach (Susan Strayed the Briny Beach)

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pp. 28-33

Peacock acquired versions of this song from Arthur Nicolle (PEA 74 No. 669) of Rocky Harbour, Everett Bennett (PEA 98 No. 767) of St. Paul’s, and Howard Morry (PEA 9 No. 59). He eventually published Nicolle’s nine-stanza rendition in Outports (1965, 3: 646–47; Payne and Walsh, 2005), adding lines from Morry’s performance to accentuate the text. Making casual reference to Bennett’s performance, Peacock noted that the three examples he had collected were “all similar, so no further recordings were made when singers suggested singing it” (Ibid., 647)....

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Bad Companions/Bad Company (Young Companions)

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pp. 34-37

Although the author of this Native American ballad is unknown, an early version appears in John Lomax’s Cowboy Songs and Other Frontier Ballads under the title“Young Companions” (1910: 81–82). Hudson, who acquired versions from Mississippi, refers to “Youth’s Companion” as a “temperance” ballad (1926: 141), while Laws refers to it as a “confession” ballad (1964: 183). The song is well distributed throughout the United States where it is known also by such titles as “Taney County,” “Young Champions,” “The Wrong Road,” “I was born in Pennsylvania,” and “Don’t Forget this Song.” In 1957 and 1960, Edith Fowke...

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The Banks of Sweet Dundee (or Undaunted Mary)

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pp. 38-41

This Old World song about courtship, social status and inheritance, otherwise known as “Undaunted Mary,” and sometimes the “Ploughboy on the Banks of Sweet Dundee,” is well documented on both sides of the Atlantic. It has been widely circulated in both oral tradition and in print by way of songsters and broadsides. The Roud Folksong and Broadside indexes include more than five hundred entries. Roud and Bishop note that the earliest print examples date to the 1820s, and while the texts vary surprisingly little, there are many tunes (2012: 142–43). On this see Cazden, Haufrecht, and Studer (1982: 192–94). The...

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The Banks of Sweet Tralee (An Answer to Undaunted Mary)

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pp. 42-46

“Banks of Sweet Tralee,” also known as “The Answer to Undaunted Mary,” is the sequel to “Banks of Sweet Dundee” discussed in the previous entry (Roud and Bishop, 2012: 426). On this also see Laws (1957: 192).Willie, who was “pressed and sent to sea” by Mary’s uncle now returns and reveals himself after returning from the war. They happily reunite and get married.

The Bodleian Library contains a number of broadsides of this ballad. In particular, see an undated example containing both songs: “Banks of Sweet Dundee” and “Answer to...

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The Bellburns Tragedy

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pp. 47-49

Following her performance of this song Clara Stevens commented,“What do you think of he? I made he. That’s two boys that lost their [lives] two years ago, thirteenth of April.” Clara recalled that she had left out stanzas six and seven. Peacock recorded the additional stanzas from her a short time later (MUNFLA, Acc. 87-157/C11077B).

In 1959, Peacock made his way to Bellburns, a community of roughly two hundred people just north of St. Paul’s on the Great Northern Peninsula. The previous year a road had finally been completed to the community, thus making it accessible by car.Here Peacock...

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The Best of Friends Must Part

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pp. 50-51

Both the sentiment of this song and the title itself are based on an old proverb,“The Best of Friends Must Part,” or “The Dearest of Friends Must Part,” versions of which date back to Chaucer (1385) (Speake, 2008: 18). In Newfoundland and Labrador, “Best of Friends Must Part” is confined to field collections. In 1951, Leach acquired a version from George Hatfield of Tors Cove (MUNFLA, Acc. 78-054, NFLD 2, tape 1-9; Leach Songs). Casey documented a version in 1968 from Madeline K. Foley of Conche (1971: 221) who informed him that she had learned it from an oral source.“ The Best of Friends Must Part"...

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The Best Thing in Life

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pp. 52-54

This is one of the few songs Peacock decided not to transcribe. The musical transcript for this song is therefore based entirely on the field recording. As the stanzas are irregular, the phrases have been identified by letters.

Roud’s one entry for this song refers to Leach’s 1950 field recording of Jim Rossiter from Cape Broyle (MUNFLA, Acc. 78-054, NFLD 1, tape 7-3; Leach Songs). Peacock recorded the song a year later from Patrick Rossiter of Fermeuse, a short distance away. Although not included in the major provincial song publications, it is part of some...

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The Big Roaring Fire (A Good Roaring Fire; A Tidy Smilin’ Wife)

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pp. 55-57

This lighthearted song celebrating the joys of marriage and domesticity is also known by such titles as “A Tidy Smilin’Wife,”“When a Chap Comes Hame,”and“We a Guid Roarin’ Fire.” It is not well known in North America. All examples are, thus far, confined to Newfoundland. Leach previously recorded the song from Jim Rice in 1950 with the title “Roarin’ Fire” (MUNFLA, Acc. 78-054, NFLD 1, tape 4–9; Leach Songs). A version of the song was also published in the Newfoundlander in 1945 (“Your Favourite Songs”).

There are many Scottish examples. The Rice text closely resembles “When a Chap...

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The Black Devil (Three Jolly Jack Tars; The Black Cook)

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pp. 58-61

In the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, doctors were permitted to use bodies of executed murderers in lectures for illustrative purposes. However, due to the shortage of cadavers for medical instruction, such practices as body snatching and grave robbery were not uncommon. The humour of “The Black Devil” is derived from an awareness of such activities. Appreciably, body snatching frequently caused public outrage and this in turn spawned commentaries from the broadside printers of the day. For one such example from Glasgow, Scotland, dating to 1823, contained in National Library of Scotland’s broadside collection, see “Correct Account of the Riots Concerning Stealing Dead Bodies,” [L.C....

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The Black Sheep

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pp. 62-64

This sentimental song, based on the theme of the prodigal son, was composed by William F. Gould (c. 1897) and published originally as “The Black Sheep Loves You Best of All” (Cazden, Haufrecht and Studer 1982: 390). For a copy of Gould’s original music score “The Black Sheep LovesYou Best of All or Better than the Rest. Song and chorus” see the Lester S. Levy Sheet Music Collection at John Hopkins University (Gould, Levy Sheet Music).

The song was subsequently popularized by William “Billy” Murray (1877–1954), the legendary “Denver Nightingale.” Murray, who was known for his precise diction, had a...

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The Bold Tinker (Daniel O’Connell)

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pp. 65-66

Although this rendition is somewhat fragmented,“The Bold Tinker” is one of a cluster of ballads pertaining to the Irish politician Daniel O’Connell (1775–1847). In 1957, Edith Fowke recorded a more complete version from traditional singer O.J. Abbott (1872–1962), originally from England but later residing in Hull, Quebec (1965: 11; 50–51). As Fowke notes, O’Connell “inspired legends” and “was the subject of innumerable broadsides” (Ibid., 171). This version, like that in Fowke, is comparable to the 1871 broadside in the Bodleian Library “Dan O’Connell or Morris O’Donnell Hatching Chickens by Steam” [(2806 b....

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Bonavista Harbour

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pp. 67-69

Stewart Little composed “Bonavista Harbour” in 1944, a few years prior to Newfoundland’s union with Canada.White Rock is a large hill overlooking the town of Bonavista. As the satire in the song suggests, the Canadians used rock from this local landmark for the construction of a wharf in the harbour. In the process, they evidently created a considerable disturbance in the community, generating much local conversation.

The song is also of interest because it is one of a series of musical exchanges to have emerged as a result of Peacock’s first Newfoundland field research. In 1952, Peacock was...

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The Boston Burglar

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pp. 70-72

The “Boston Burglar” is considered to be a North American adaptation of a much earlier song called“Botany Bay,”or alternatively“TheTransport”or“TheWhitby Lad.” The origins of that song date to between 1820 and 1824 (Cox, [1925]1963: 296; Laws, 1957: 175; Cazden, Haufrecht, and Studer, 1982: 427). Both “The Boston Burglar” and “Botany Bay” are well distributed on both sides of the Atlantic. For one of many broadside examples of the earlier ballad, in the Bodleian Library’s broadside collection see “Botany Bay” (c.1863–1885) containing the imprint of H. Such of London [Harding B.11 (4372); Broadside Ballads...

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The Boy That Wore the Blue (The Soldier’s Letter)

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pp. 73-75

Becky Bennett’s performance of this thirteen-stanza song was slow and sombre, almost ten minutes long, with each stanza lasting over thirty seconds. Although Bennett sings “two days to blow” in line four of stanza one, this appears to be a corruption of “perhaps to ease the blow” (Grover, 1973: 166) or “perhaps may ease your woe” (Fowke, 1963a: 38).In stanza six, although she sings “manna ball, it is likely “minnie ball” (Ives, 1965: 43; Grover, 1973: 167).

Although not much is known about this sentimental war ballad, which also goes by the title “The Soldier’s Letter” it likely dates to the American Civil War (1861–1865) and...

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The Brave Engineer (The Wreck of Number Nine)

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pp. 76-78

This fictitious account of a train disaster was originally composed by country music pioneer Carson J.Robinson (1890–1957) and is more commonly known as“TheWreck of Number Nine” (Cohen, 1981: 267–71). Described by Malcolm Laws (1964: 225) as a “melodramatic and sentimental piece,” it was popularized through multiple recordings byVernon Dalhart. Dalhart and Robinson, both pioneers of country and western music, were collaborators for a brief period in the 1920s.Robinson had also accompanied Dalhart on another train wreck song “Wreck of the Old 97” (Meade, Spottswood, and Meade, 2002: 72–73). That song...

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Bright Phoebe

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pp. 79-80

Peacock notes “Bright Phoebe” is “one of the most beautiful of the Newfoundland collection” (1965, 2: 435). During his field research he acquired three examples of the song, all from Newfoundland’s west coast. In addition to this version by Becky Bennett, he collected versions from Charlotte Decker (PEA 154 No. 1001) of Parson’s Pond and Leonard Hulan (PEA 185 No. 1124) of Jeffrey’s. Peacock published the Decker and Hulan renditions (1965, 2: 434–35), remarking that a third variant by Becky Bennett was “similar to Mrs. Decker’s, though a little more ornate.”...

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Burgeo Jail

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pp. 81-83

MacEdward Leach notes that local songs are often “highly evocative,” and that the clues given in the song text allow participants to “picture the whole story” (1965: 205). As Leach certainly appreciated, this is not always easy for an outsider as,“to be equivalently moved, he would have to be supplied with a detailed context.” Perhaps this humorous local composition was a little too esoteric for most people and so Peacock chose to exclude it from Outports.

Although there are additional versions of the song, these are confined to field collections.MUNFLA’s Song Title Index lists a ten-stanza version called“Burgeo Trail,”(Acc.71-2/...

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Coaker’s Dream

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pp. 84-88

Ned Rice, who pronounced “Coaker” as “Croaker,” evidently enjoyed singing this song, and when he finished there was a burst of laughter from those that were in the room (MUNFLA, Acc. 87-157/C11031A).

In the history of the Dominion of Newfoundland,William Ford Coaker (1871–1938) is considered to be a visionary, but also a controversial figure. Educated at Bishop Field College in St. John’s, from his early years at school he was a collective action organizer. Later, in 1908, while working as a farmer and an agent for a fish merchant, Coaker began...

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The Coat ThatWas Buttoned Behind (An Irishman’s Coat It Is Buttoned Before)

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pp. 89-91

Laughter abounded in the room when Freeman Bennett performed this song.

The original title for this comic Irish American song is “An Irishman’s Coat It Is Buttoned Before.” It was performed by Tony Pastor (1837–1908), also known as the father of vaudeville (Brown: 1870). The lyrics were published in Tony Pastor’s Complete Budget of Comic Songs: Containing a Collection of Several Hundred Original Local Lays, Eccentric Lyrics, Comic Songs,Humorous Irish Ballads, Patriotic Vocal Gems, Stump Speeches, and Burlesque Orations. As Written, Sung, and Delivered by theWorld-Famed ComicVocalist and Stump Orator, Tony Pastor...

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Concerning One Spring in Bonay

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pp. 92-94

The context for this locally composed song is the annual migration from Newfoundland to the coast of Labrador to prosecute the summer fishery, which usually lasted from May to September. Cuff notes that by the mid-1880s at least 10 percent of Newfoundland’s population was engaged in the Labrador fishery (1991: 228). This would have also included some women and children. The location of this particular song was the island of Bonne Espérance, situated on the north shore of Quebec near the mouth of St. Paul’s River in the Strait of Belle Isle. As early as the 1600s, Bonne Espérance was known to Europeans, and...

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The Cow Puncher’s Lament (When the Work’s All Done This Fall)

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pp. 95-98

This occupational cowboy ballad, known mainly throughout United States as “When the Work’s All Done this Fall” or “After the Round Up” and “Dixie Cowboy,” is attributed to Dominic J. O’Malley (1867–1943) of Miles City, Montana. According to White, O’Malley first gave his lyrics to the Stock Growers’ Journal on October 6, 1893, with the name “After the Roundup” (1967: 113–29). The song was later published in John Lomax’s Cowboy Songs and Other Frontier Ballads (1910: 53–55) under the title “When the Work’s All Done This Fall.” Sandberg also published it with a melody acquired from Radio Mack of San Francisco...

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Currant Island Wedding

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pp. 99-101

James Decker was quite animated when telling Peacock the story of this locally composed song. As he explained, it had been made up by John Tom Keans of Bonne Bay (MUNFLA, Acc. 87-157/C11054B). It pertains to the marriage of Old Sammy Coombs’ daughter from Current Island. Charlotte Decker added,“Tis a wedding see…wedding on [Currant Island and] they wanted a big time. Fellas was aboard [the] vessel see.” The song was obviously known by both singers, for, when Decker started singing, his wife joined in.

Currant Island (also known as Current Island) is a small rocky island located near...

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The Dance at Daniel’s Harbour

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pp. 102-103

There may be more to this brief song as, between stanza three and four, Becky Bennett paused and remarked to Peacock,“Now I don’t know it. I don’t know whether it’s right or not. That’s the only bits I knows […] That’s all I knows it’s the last verse” (MUNFLA, Acc.87-157/C11049A). The Bennetts attribute this local song to Sam House of Bellburns, who had supposedly composed it sometime in the 1920s.

Daniel’s Harbour is about fifty kilometres north of St. Paul’s on the Great Northern Peninsula. Although the song may have been too esoteric for Peacock to include in Outports,...

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Daniel Sullivan

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pp. 104-106

This murder ballad pertains to the 1890 hanging of Daniel Sullivan, a lumberjack from Liverpool, Nova Scotia (Laws, 1964: 187). Peacock makes a casual reference to this song in his discussion of another ballad “The Murder of Ann O’Brien.” Here he notes that because “the text is badly mixed up” it was not included in Outports (1965, 2: 623).

As Peacock’s field tape reveals (MUNFLA, Acc. 87-157/ C11049B), with some coaxing from her husband, Becky Bennett was able to recall a substantial amount of the song. The sequence of events in her version shows some similarity with a rendition collected by...

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The Dark-Eyed Sailor

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pp. 107-110

Peacock collected versions of “The Dark-Eyed Sailor” from Howard Morry (PEA 8 No. 53) of Ferryland, James Heaney (MS 26) of Stock Cove, and two recordings from Charlotte Decker of Parsons Pond made in 1958 and 1959 (PEA 109 No. 820 and Pea 154 No. 1000). He later published a tune-text collation of “The Dark-Eyed Sailor” in Outports (1965, 2: 513–14; Payne andWalsh, 2005) consisting of Decker’s tune taken from the 1959 recording along with Morry’s nine-stanza text. He also noted, “All the Newfoundland variants of this English broadside song are similar” (Ibid., 514). Decker’s text and melody for “The...

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Doctor Fletcher (Dr. Pritchard)

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pp. 111-113

Nicolas Keough sings this song in a very punctuated or staccato fashion. Charlotte Decker, who was evidently present during the recording, commented at the end, “That’s a good old song isn’t it” (MUNFLA, Acc. 87-157/ C11077A).

“Doctor Fletcher,” a corruption of “Dr. Pritchard,” is certainly rare in Newfoundland, as there are no other examples in print or unpublished collections. It is possible that Keough acquired it somewhere in the lumber camps. The song is based on the real-life events surrounding the execution of Dr. Edward William Pritchard who was hanged on July 28,...

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The Dying Soldier

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pp. 114-116

This locally composed song is one of several that Peacock passed Gerald S. Doyle for his third publication Old-Time Songs of Newfoundland (1955: 65; Guigné, 2007a). “Rennie’s Ridge” in stanza eight is more likely Vimy Ridge, France, where many Newfoundlanders fought during World War I (1914–1918). Rennie’s Riverside and O’Brien’s Bridge mentioned in stanza nine are located in St. John’s. Rossiter’s rendition closely matches a text called “The Dying Soldier” attributed to James Murphy in Richard Budgen’s 100 Local Poems (1918: 31). The last four lines of the poem, missing from Rossiter’s rendition, are as...

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Erin’s Lovely Home (Seven Links upon My Chain)

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pp. 117-119

Throughout his performance of this song Freeman Payne pronounces the word “Erin” as “Erian.” Roud and Bishop note that “Erin’s Lovely Home” “is another treatment of the ‘family opposition’ theme, narrated by the young man who is waiting to be transported for seven years” (2012: 169–70, 435).Why, however, is never quite clear. The song is well known in the British Isles where, at the turn of the twentieth century, it was widely collected by severalVictorian collectors including Cecil Sharp,Ralph Vaughan Williams, Lucy Broadwood, Frank Kidson, and Sabine Baring-Gould (Roud Folksong and Broadside Indexes). See Ord...

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Fair Fanny Moore

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pp. 120-122

Peacock collected an earlier version of “Fair Fanny Moore” (PEA 116 No. 852) from Annie Walters of Rocky Harbour in 1958, which was published in Outports (1965, 2: 610–11). He makes no mention of this example from Emanuel Osborne.

Most versions of this gruesome murder ballad appear in North American collections under such titles as “Fanny Moore,” “Fair Fanny Moore,” and “Young Fanny Moore.” The earliest documented example of “Fair Fanny Moore” in North America, dating to 1903, appears in Belden (1940: 139–41). It was also included in a number of other early American...

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The Faithful Sailor Boy

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pp. 123-126

This is one of six songs that Peacock acquired from Lucy (Mahoney) Heaney. Although Peacock published the other songs—including “The False Maiden,” “Young Edmund of the Lowlands Low,” “Who is At my Window Weeping,” and “The Rosy Banks of Green”—in Outports, perhaps as the melody of this one was far too modern and the lyrics overly sentimental, he decided to reject it. It’s hard to say where Lucy Heaney learned this version. As some of the Mahoney family migrated to places such as Boston and NewYork for work in factories and in service industries perhaps this might have been a source (Brenda Haley...

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The Farmer’s Boy

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pp. 127-129

Although “The Farmer’s Boy” is well known on both sides of the Atlantic, as many of the four hundred or more examples in the Roud Folksong and Broadside indexes illustrate, it is particularly well represented in English collections. Pickering discusses how the song functions on various levels particularly in rural England (1983: 44–64). He argues that at first glance we might assume “The Farmer’s Boy” idealizes the attractiveness of village culture and the rural life of nineteenth century England (Ibid., 54). In reality, it functions at a much deeper level addressing issues of poverty, migrant labour, the working class, and child labour....

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Fifteen Years Ago

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pp. 130-132

Although Philip Foley’s “Fifteen Years ago” typifies many nineteenth century reminiscence songs, its origin is elusive. The best that can be said is that, in sentiment, it is similar to songs such as Emilie Langlotz’s “Twenty Years Ago” (1852) and R.B. Sanford’s “Just Twenty Years Ago” (1853), examples of which are in the Library of Congress’s American Sheet Music Collection. The song “Twenty Years Ago” is well known, and it appears in at least one Canadian folk-song collection (Ives, 1999: 196–97). In Newfoundland, a comparable text for “Twenty Years Ago” also appears in two of John Burke’s songsters: Burke’s Christmas...

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Five-Boss Highway

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pp. 133-135

“Five-Boss Highway” is a moniker song. Cazden, Haufrecht and Studer (1982: 342) note that the narrative intent of this particular genre of song “serves largely to pass in review and to make comment,” either with humour or satire, about specific individuals and situations in a work situation such as a lumber camp, or in this case, on a construction site. They also add that,“In order to show or to pretend that no offense was meant, the singer would usually include a lampoon of himself.” Such is the case with “Five-Boss Highway.”

Bennett notes that it was composed in 1925 by F.M. [Micky Jim] McNeil (1901–1948) and pertains to the construction of a road in the Codroy Valley that would eventually...

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Frozen Charlotte (Young Charlotte)

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pp. 136-138

This Native American ballad, known mainly as either “Frozen Charlotte” or “Young Charlotte,” is widely dispersed throughout the United States and eastern Canada, where it appears in many publications and numerous field collections. Creighton ([1932] 1966: 328–31;1971:141–42),Fowke (1981:51), and MacKenzie (1928:161–63) have all published versions. Fowke and Rahn, who also include a version in A Family Heritage: The Story and Songs of LaRena Clark, note that it “seems to be the most popular and most widespread of all folk ballads composed in North America” (1994: 212). “Frozen Charlotte” was also...

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The Gay Spanish Maid

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pp. 139-141

“The Gay Spanish Maid” has appeared in print in Newfoundland and Labrador just once. Leach published two Labrador versions he had acquired in 1960, from Rose Eustis of Green Island Brook and from Albert Dumaresque of Lance au Clair (1965: 66–69). There is also a casual reference to the song in the “Your Favourite Songs” column of the Newfoundlander. In October 1944, both Gretta Johnston of Jacques Fontaine and Isabella Currie of Cain’s Island sent copies of the lyrics to that newspaper, which the publisher hoped “to have in early issues” (“Your Favourite Songs.‘The Gay Spanish Maid’”)....

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Give an Honest Irish Lad a Chance (The Honest Irish Lad)

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pp. 142-145

“Give an Irish Man a Chance,”or alternately“The Honest Irish Lad,”was composed around 1880 by the Irish American piper Thomas F. Kerrigan (c. 1841–1901) along with dancer Dan McCarthy. The pair performed as “The Irish Pipers and Dancers” (Gardiner, 2009: 243). As discussed earlier in this edition, McCarthy also helped to popularize “The Boston Burglar.” Both men were actively involved in vaudeville and minstrel shows in the United States and, for McCarthy, to some extent in Canada. In the later part of the nineteenth century, their music held great appeal for the Irish ethnic population. The song is one of many pertaining to the Irish experience in the New World in the last century (Wright...

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Gold Is the Root of Evil (You Rambling Boys of Pleasure)

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pp. 146-148

This OldWorld ballad is also known as “You Rambling Boys of Pleasure,” “The Rambling Boys of Pleasure,”“Ye Roving Lads of Pleasure”and occasionally“Sally’s Garden”or“Down by Sally’s Garden.” Although the song is well represented in the manuscripts of theVictorian collectors and additional versions appear in songsters on both sides of the Atlantic (Roud Broadside and Folksong indexes), it is infrequently included in song collections. For a British example see “Rambling Boys of Pleasure” in Purslow (1974: 77), and for an Irish version see “The Rambling Boys of Pleasure” in O Boyle (1976: 84–85)....

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Goodbye John, But Don’t Stop Long

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pp. 149-152

This humorous nautical ballad was composed sometime before 1867 by G.W. Hunt (1839–1904) and popularized by Arthur Lloyd (1840–1904), one of the famous Lions Comiques of the British music halls (Mr. G.W. Hunt’s “Latest Successes”). The original title was “Goodbye John, or the Lass that Loved a Sailor.” Perhaps this was a throwback to one of Charles Dibden’s (1745–1814) most popular songs,“The Lass that loved a Sailor.” Baker and Miall (1983: 143) note in the Everyman’s Book of Sea Songs that, although Dibden’s theatrical venture The Round Robin was “a disastrous failure,” the song “The Lass that Loves...

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Grief Is a Knot (False Willie)

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pp. 153-155

The analogy used in the opening line of this song of tragic love is so subtle. A grief knot is a trick knot that slips apart.

In addition to this example by Anastasia Ghaney, who gave it the title “False Willie,” Peacock recorded a fourteen-stanza example from Rebecca Bennett of St. Paul’s (PEA 94-752) Outports (1965,3:673–74;Payne and Walsh,2005), into which he then incorporated Ghaney’s stanza eleven. Ghaney’s rendition is a little faster that Becky Bennett’s, and in the first line of the last stanza she puts particular stress on the word “sorrowful.” Sometime...

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The Grounding of the Cabot Strait

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pp. 156-157

The S.S. Cabot Strait was a 2043-ton Canadian National Railway passenger ferry and one of the Alphabet fleet servicing the coastlines of Newfoundland and Labrador (Hanrahan, 2007: 202-03). Originally built in Scotland, the vessel was named for the 110-kilometre waterway between Cape Ray, Newfoundland, and Cape North, Cape Breton Island. It replaced the Caribou, which had been destroyed by a German submarine in 1942. For a discussion of that song in this collection, see “The Loss of the Caribou.”

On January 17, 1957, the Cabot Strait went aground one hundred yards from Grand Bay, near Port aux Basques. The vessel was carrying mail from Sydney to Port aux Basques...

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Harry Dunn (The Hanging Limb)

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pp. 158-160

In his research on the Newfoundland lumber camp song tradition, Ashton identifies a large group of ballads that are “migratory pieces” circulating in local lumber camps in Newfoundland, but also belonging to the wider North American occupational tradition (1986: 213–31). This material includes songs on daily life, but also another body of songs known as disaster ballads. This lumberwoods song, which is part of that large body of migratory logging songs, deals with the tragic death of a young man whilst at work. Also known variously as “The Woods of Michigan,” “Harry Dunn,” or “The Hanging Limb,” it...

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H’emmer Jane

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pp. 161-164

In 1951, shortly after Peacock arrived in St. John’s, he attempted to make contact with businessman Gerald S. Doyle. As previously discussed for “Bonavista Harbour” in this collection, Doyle had a vested interest in the documentation of Newfoundland folk song. Although Doyle happened to be out of town, Peacock met one of his good friends, lawyer Lloyd Soper. Soper offered to sing some songs for the young Canadian and invited him to come to his Duckworth street office the next day. Much to Soper’s amusement, Peacock arrived at his door with a bottle of rum in hand (Guigné, 2008a: 96). So it was that...

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Henry Connors

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pp. 165-167

This song of Irish origin is one of many dealing with the theme of a transported convict, but it is not that widely known on either side of the Atlantic. The Roud Folksong and Broadside indexes include sixteen entries. Sam Henry, who probably published the earliest version in 1926 (entitled “Henry Connor of Castledawson”) notes that “the episode commemorated in the ballad had occurred about 100 years ago” (Huntington, 1990: 440–41). Harry Curtis’s rendition makes it known that Connor is bound for Queenstown (New SouthWales);this was one of several destinations for British convicts in the 1700s and 1800s....

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Highway Song (Employment Song)

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pp. 168-170

Bennett (2013: 29-30) notes that this song was composed around 1925 by Micky Jim MacNeil (1901–1948) of the Codroy Valley and it was originally named “Employment Song.”Line two of the last stanza, containing the phrase“five-boss highway” is a direct reference to MacNeil’s earlier composition on the politics of working for bosses that appear to know too much. As discussed in “Five-Boss Highway” earlier in this collection, MacNeil’s earlier song caused such a stir, he composed this as a sequel. In 1964, John F. Szwed collected “The Employment Song” from MacNeil’s friend and fellow composer Paul E. Hall...

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The High Road to St. Paul’s

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pp. 171-173

Rillie’s husband Anthony Bryan (1925–1999) composed this song in 1955. The foreman was likely Arthur Bennett (b.1898) of St. Paul’s. This account of a man missing work, and subsequently his pay, because of the flu is notable because it is a marker for a point in time when the communities around the Gros Morne area were undergoing a significant period of growth. During this period, access to the region north of Bonne Bay was limited. Although a road had existed between Deer Lake, Lomand, and Woody Point for several years, it was crude and occasionally had to be closed due to poor conditions (“Bonne Bay...

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The Hills of Glenshee (The Lass of Glenshee)

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pp. 174-176

In Vagabond Songs and Ballads (1904: 14) Ford attributes this song, known elsewhere as “The Lass O’ Glenshee,” to Andrew Sharpe, a shoemaker from Perth who died there February 5, 1817. See also several examples in The Greig-Duncan Folksong Collection (Shuldham-Shaw and McNaughtan 1995, 5: 50–58). Ord ([1930] 1974: 75), who includes a text for “The Lass O’ Glenshee” notes that it is sung to the Air “The Road and the Miles to Dundee.”

The song appears to have been popular, for it was listed in many broadside catalogues (Roud Folksong and Broadside indexes), and the Bodleian Library’s broadside ballad collection...

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Hitler’s Song (sung to the tune of the “Squid Jiggin’ Ground”)

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pp. 177-181

This parodial song is based on the “tune and lyrical idea” (Narváez, 2012: 120) of “Squid Jiggin’ Ground” (Roud 4429), composed by Arthur Scammell (1913–1995) a native of Change Islands, Notre Dame. Ned Rice performed the song along with “Our Boys Gave Up Squiddin,’” also in this collection, using the same tune. Both of these satirical songs reflect local response to the tumultuous period of World War II. In Newfoundland and Labrador, as elsewhere, folk composers responded to periods of war with song and poetry. For the World War I period see for example “The Dying Soldier” discussed earlier and see...

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The Hole in the Wall

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pp. 182-184

This local song was originally composed by Peter Leonard of St. Leonard’s, Placentia Bay. Lehr and Best, who collected a version from Pius Power senior in 1980, note that the name pertains to the community of Little Bona and a dance that was held there one night (Lehr, 1985: 93–94). Leonard, who was known locally as “Peter the Poet,” composed several songs about local topics in the Placentia Bay area. Anita Best notes,“Leonard was from Isle Valen in Placentia Bay, and lived in St. Leonard’s and St. Kyran’s. He was known for the songs he would make about local people and events in the various communities he visited around...

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I Once Knew a Man (S-a-v-e-d; I’m Saved)

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pp. 185-186

Jim Bennett called this song “I once knew a man.” Elsewhere it’s known as “I’m S-A-V-ED,” “S-A-V-E-D” or “G-L-O-R-Y to Know” (Traditional Ballad Index, FSWB349). In 1960, MacEdward Leach acquired a version of “S-A-V-E-D”from Leo O’Brien of Lance au Loup (1965: 301; Borlase, 1993: 175). All other locally documented examples of this early twentieth century song come from St. Paul’s and Cow Head on the Great Northern Peninsula. In 1966, Herbert Halpert and John Widdowson recorded the song from Jim’s father, Everett Bennett, and they also collected it from Charles and Martha Hutchings of Cow Head...

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I’m Bound Away for Canada (My Dear I’m Bound for Canaday)

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pp. 187-190

Rillie Bryan informed Peacock that Bob Lewis of Rocky Harbour had written out the lyrics of “I’m Bound Away for Canada” for her (MUNFLA, Acc. 87-157/C11077A). In 1971, while carrying out fieldwork on the Great Northern Peninsula, Halpert re-collected the song from Bryan (MUNFLA, STI, Acc. 71-50/ C973). The song is likely a local composition; all examples in the Roud Folksong Index are confined to Newfoundland. Greenleaf, who collected it as “My Dear I’m Bound for Canady” from John Lewis, Bob Noftal, and family of Fleur de Lys, noted then that the song was popular about fifty years...

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In Bright and Bonny Scotland (The Paisley Officer)

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pp. 191-196

At the end of her performance of “Bright and Bonny Scotland,” Charlotte Decker commented to Peacock, “That’s a pretty song. They both died together” (MUNFLA, Acc. 87-157/C11041B).

In line one of stanza two Annie Walters notes that the officer is from Dissalley Town, while Charlotte Decker notes that he is from Dislington. These interpretations are a corruption of the phrase “PaisleyTown.” The similarities in the song texts suggests that Walters and Decker acquired the song from the same source, or perhaps...

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In the Shadows of the Pines

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pp. 197-201

Hattie Lummis of Pittsburg, Kansas, composed “In the Shadow of the Pines” sometime around 1895, primarily as an advertisement for the Wabash Railway. As the story goes, C.S. Crane, the general passenger agent for the railway, offered Lummis one thousand dollars to create an acrostic poem that would spell out Wabash in the first stanza. He additionally arranged to have the poem published in Godey’s Lady’s Book, a fashionable American women’s magazine (“Written as an Ad”). The name and address of the general passenger agent were supposedly hidden in a cryptogram in the second and third verses of the...

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The I.W.A. Strike

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pp. 202-205

When Peacock returned to Newfoundland in the summer of 1959, he recorded two locally composed songs:“The Loggers Plight” (PEA 145 No. 969), performed by Arthur Nicolle of Rocky Harbour, and “The I.W.A. Strike” (160-1027), composed and performed by Clara Stevens. Both songs pertained to the controversial unionization of the logging industry, and had been made up the previous winter during a bitter and divisive loggers’ strike called by the International Woodworkers of America (IWA) (Collins, 2014; Sutherland, 1995).

Peacock published “The Loggers Plight” largely to illustrate how “contemporary events are still recorded in the traditional ballad form” (1965, 3: 756; Payne and Walsh, 2005). He...

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Jack and Joe (Give My Love to Nell)

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pp. 206-208

In the last stanza of this song, Becky Bennett contributed the last couple of lines just before the recording was cut short. McNeil, who includes a version of “Jack and Joe” in Southern Folk Ballads (1987: 116-117), notes that the words and music of this sentimental parlour song, also known as Give My Love to Nell, are attributed to William Benson Gray (1894). McNeil notes that Gray was a pseudonym for Glenroy, a vaudevillian who “got his start in show business as a member of the Glenroy Brothers exhibition boxers”(Ibid., 117). Other songs by Gray (Glenroy) include She’s More to Be Pitied than Censured (1898), and The Volunteer Organist (1893)....

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The Jacket So Blue (Bonnet So Blue)

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pp. 209-211

Alternatively known by such titles as “Bonnet so Blue,” “The Bonnet o’ Blue” and “The Bonny Scotch Lad,” this song dates to the early 1800s. It is known on both sides of the Atlantic, although less so in the United States. For the full range of examples, see the Roud Folksong and Broadside indexes. The “Jacket So Blue” is well documented in eastern and central Canada. Creighton collected “His Jacket Was Blue” from Angelo Dornan in New Brunswick (1971: 99–100) and from Nathan Hatt of Nova Scotia. For Hatt’s rendition see Creighton’s Folk Music of Nova Scotia (Folkways, 1956). Grover of Nova Scotia includes...

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James McGee (James MaGee)

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pp. 212-213

This is a somewhat distilled version of the Irish song “James McKee” (Shields, 1981: 105). Although not immediately obvious in Ron Hoven’s rendition, the subject matter relates to political strife and relationships between Irish Protestant landowners and Irish Catholic tenants. The intent of the aunt was to obtain the nephew’s land by having him banished to New South Wales. Shields dates the song to the early part of the nineteenth century and notes that most versions come from Ulster (Ibid., 105). Morton, who includes “James MaGee” in Folksongs Sung in Ulster remarks, “It has been argued to some effect that the...

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Jim O’Lynn

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pp. 214-216

This seems to be related in some way to “Brian O’Linn” (Roud 294). Leach, who published an example of that song, notes that it is also known by such titles as “Tommy Linn,”Tam O’ the Lin,” “Bryan O’Lynn,” “Tom Boleyn,” and “Thom of Lyn” (1965: 273). Roud and Bishop note that “Bryan O’Lynn” goes back at least five hundred years and that it was well known throughout the British Isles (2012: 467). It was a popular song in the sixteenth century, where it was mentioned in three separate printed references.

According to Sam Henry, the “comic hero” Bryan O’Lynn was “of the ancient Irish clan of O’Lynns, of Hy Tuirtre, who were descended from Colla Ua.a [sic], a king of Ireland...

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John Mitchell (Mitchell’s Address)

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pp. 217-220

In Songs of the Irish Rebellion Zimmerman notes that street ballads “were a nearly collective expression of commonly held beliefs or prejudices and of popular aspirations, and we may regard them as a running commentary on Irish political life as seen from below” (2002: 10).Such is the case with this song recounting the exile of the Irish nationalist John Mitchell (1815–1875), also known as Mitchel. A native of Camnish, County Derry, Ireland, Mitchell was one of a group of men known as the Newry radicals, who rebelled against British repression and advocated for an independent Ireland.

In 1842, he aligned with the politician Daniel O’Connell and the repeal association....

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John Yetman

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pp. 221-223

The murder of John Yetman (1879–1903) on July 1, 1903, was well covered by local newspapers of the day. A native of St. Mary’s Bay and the son of Matthew and Bridget Yetman, the young man joined the schooner Helen F. Whitten in the spring of that year. David B. Smith and Company of Gloucester, New England, owned the vessel. Captain Frank Wollard, originally of Exeter, United Kingdom, had been fishing out of Gloucester for several years. In March 1903, he set out toward the Grand Banks with a new crew. From the beginning there were problems with retention. Many of the men were inexperienced,...

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The Kaiser’s Dream

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pp. 224-227

Throughout his singing of this song Bennett pronounces the “ai” in “Kaiser” like the “a” in “cake.” When Freeman Bennett first performed “Kaiser’s Dream” for Peacock, he sang stanzas one to three, five, six, and nine. His wife Becky reminded him that he had forgotten a number of stanzas. She is heard in the background reciting them (MUNFLA, Acc.87-157/ C11056B). Peacock’s transcript of the song is a reconstruction of their sense of the order of the song. For some reason, although Bennett performed stanza eight, Peacock eliminated it in his original transcript. The additional stanza has been included in this transcript based...

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Kelly and the Ghost (Maurice Kelly)

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pp. 228-229

Peacock acquired two versions of this comic Newfoundland song; a second rendition performed by Rebecca Bennett (PEA 85 No. 715) of St. Paul’s, which is not published here, closely matches this example. Mercer attributes the song to the well-known St. John’s bard Johnny Burke, who included “How Kelly Fought the Ghost” in The Duke of York Songster and Christmas Advertiser (1901), co-published with fellow poet James Murphy (1978: 221). Mercer’s source was Michael P. Murphy, who included “extracts” of the songster in the Daily News (1979: 65). Also see a text for the song in Murphy’s Pathways to Yesterday (1976:...

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Kenneth Shephard

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pp. 230-232

The Bennetts attribute this song to Sam House of Bellburns, who supposedly composed it several years previous.Kenneth Sheppard (1881–1937) of nearby Brig Bay was a legendary rumrunner on the Great Northern Peninsula, and his ability to outwit the authorities provided great fodder for local wordsmiths. Earl B. Pilgrim’s account The Sheppards Are Coming: An Exciting True Story of Rum Running (2007) places the events in the late 1920s.

The surname in this song varies from “Sheppard” to “Shephard” or “Shepherd.” Leach collected a related version called “Captain Shepherd” in 1960 from Henry Belber of Lance au Loup, Labrador (1965: 214–15). There is a casual reference to lyrics for “Kenneth...

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A Lad and a Lass (No Sign of Marriage)

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pp. 233-235

As the field recording reveals (MUNFLA, Acc. 87-157/C11046A), the Bennetts were trying to piece together this song. Rebecca Bennett informed Peacock that she had learned “A Lad and a Lass” from her uncle. She also thought there might have been more to the last stanza. Peacock obtained a second version of this song from Charlotte Decker (PEA 107 No. 806) of Parsons Pond. He eventually published a collation of Charlotte Decker’s tune and Bennett’s text, which also includes some phrases from Decker’s version (1965, 2: 542–44). This collation was mainly because Peacock felt that Bennett’s text was somewhat...

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The Little Harbour Bargain Store

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pp. 236-238

In 1952, while visiting Fogo Island, a large island 22.5 kilometres off the mainland of Newfoundland’s northeast coast, Peacock encountered Chris Cobb (1897–1968), a fisherman and veteran living in Barr’d Islands. Cobb was viewed as “a talented song-writer and performer” throughout all of Fogo Island (Primmer, 1983: 26).

Peacock was often impressed with the “living folksong tradition,” which he witnessed in places such as Fogo (1956: 5). He had a great regard for Cobb’s talents as a folk poet, once remarking, “One of the wittiest and most prolific of these latter-day bards is Chris Cobb who lives in Barred [sic] Island, a small settlement off the northeast coast. He...

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Lonely Since My Mother Died

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pp. 239-240

Becky Bennett informed Peacock that she learned this song when she was eight ears old, along with “Kaiser’s Dream,” also in this collection (MUNFLA, Acc. 87-157/C11056A.) “I’m Lonely Since My Mother Died” was composed in 1863 by the nineteenth century American songwriter Henry S. Thompson and published by Oliver Ditson of Boston (Thompson, 1863). Thompson is known to have published a number of musical compositions for the blackface minstrel shows popular in the nineteenth century. This form of mass entertainment was by design racist in nature in that it was an appropriation of Afro-American...

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The Loss of the Atlantic

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pp. 241-243

Prior to the sinking of the Titanic in 1912, the wreck on the S.S. Atlantic was one of the worst shipping disasters to occur off Canada’s shores. Described by MacKenzie as a “Crack ship of the new White Star Line,” the Atlantic was a class-A1 four-masted barque-rigged iron vessel (1928: 229). Built in Belfast in 1871, the vessel registered 3,723 tons, 420 feet long, 40 feet in the beam, and 23 feet in depth.

On March 20, 1873, the Atlantic sailed from Liverpool for New York with 952 passengers and crew on board; many of them were Irish emigrants bound for a new world and a new life...

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The Loss of the Caribou

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pp. 244-246

This disaster song, sung to the tune of the Irish ballad “Spancil Hill” composed by Michael Considine (1850–1873), pertains to sinking of the Newfoundland coastal ferry the S. S. Caribou. Goodwin-Hamilton S. Adamson Limited in Rotterdam built the vessel for the Newfoundland government railway service, which also included a fleet of coastal vessels. Capable of carrying four hundred passengers and fifty carloads of freight, the Caribou was launched in June 1925, shortly thereafter replacing the S. S. Kyle as the gulf ferry servicing the 154.4 kilometre run between Port aux Basques and North Sydney, Nova Scotia...

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The Loss of the Schooner Arabelle

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pp. 247-248

Peacock probably chose not to publish “Loss of the Schooner Arabelle” because the song is a fragment of a much longer account of a shipwreck. Not much is known about the vessel Arabelle except that she capsized about 16 kilometres from the Bay of Islands sometime prior to the end of December 1880. According to a report of the schooner’s demise submitted by telegraph to the York Herald, on December 21 of that year, the Arabelle was coming back from Chatteau, Labrador, and bound for Bay of Islands with a load of herring when it ran into a heavy gale. The one body found was that of Thomas Parsons. The following is...

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Love’s Not Like It Used to Be

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pp. 249-250

Although the music score for this song seems to no longer be available, the song may have been composed by the Irish American James Thornton (1861–1938) and copyrighted in 1893 to the Tin Pan Alley publisher Frank Harding. According to a web source, it was printed in volume forty-one of Wehman’s Universal Songster, a monthly magazine (“Love Is Not What It Used to Be”).

Originally from Liverpool, England, Thornton immigrated to Boston as a boy and eventually had an extensive career as a vaudeville performer and comedian. Thornton’s...

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The Lovely Cottage Maid (The Cottage Maid)

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pp. 251-253

The motif of true lovers exchanging or dividing some kind of memorable object as a keepsake prior to a long departure is frequently used in ballads. In this collection, see for example “The Dark-Eyed Sailor,” wherein a token is created by the splitting of a gold band. Most often the man returns and presents the object. His lover professes that she cannot love another, as she will be true to her own true love. At this point the hero reveals his true identity and the tale most often ends in wedlock.

In this version of “The Cottage Maid” performed by Osborne, we don’t know the specifics of Willie’s “love’s token” for Emily; nor do we know exactly where he has been...

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Lovely Mary Ann (Blooming Mary Ann)

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pp. 254-255

In some remote way this song is reminiscent of “The Farmer’s Daughter” discussed earlier in this collection. It seems to be a local composition, but there is little information about its origins. In addition to this example, Peacock also collected and published two additional versions (1965, 2: 505–06):“Blooming Mary Ann” (PEA 132 No. 914) from Joseph Bruce of Searston and “Lovely Mary Ann” (PEA 127 No. 893) from Kenneth Pink of Rose Blanche, for which he published one stanza.

In 1951, Leach acquired “Blooming Mary Anne” from Cyril O’Brien of Trepassey (MUNFLA, Acc. 78-054 NFLD 2, tape 6A-2; Leach Songs). In 1960, while in Labrador...

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The Maid of the Mountain Brow (At the Foot of the Mountain Brow)

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pp. 256-259

This song of Irish origin is alternatively known as “The Maid of the Sweet Brown Knowe” (O Lochlainn, 1958: 38; Huntington, 1990: 364; Hayward, 1925: 85–86; Ó Cróinín, 2000: 263). For an early example at the Bodleian Library, see “A New Song Called the Maid of the Sweet Brown Howe” published by Peter Brereton (c. 1860–1880) of 56 Cooke Street of Dublin [2806 b.9 (179); Broadside Ballads Online]. The song is also well known on this side of the Atlantic, but mainly in the northeastern United States and Canada, where it has circulated in the lumber camps (Cazden, Haufrecht, and Studer, 1982: 115). For versions...

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Mickey Milligan’s Pup (Brannigan’s Pup)

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pp. 260-262

As the field tape recording for this song reveals, during James Decker’s performance of “Micky Milligan’s Pup” for Peacock (MUNFLA, Acc. 87-157/C11057A) there was great laughter from those in the room, especially when he started singing the chorus “To me bow wow wow.”

Cazden, Haufrecht, and Studer (1982: 461) note that this comic Irish American song, originally called “Micky Brannigan’s Pup” dates to around 1879 and was composed by the vaudeville character, Gus Phillips, who went by the stage name of “Offty Gooft.” It was...

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The Mine at Baie Verte

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pp. 263-265

In 1960, while carrying out his fifth season of fieldwork, Peacock took an exploratory trip to Seal Cove, White Bay. His reason for visiting this part of the province was that the community had just become accessible by road. Here he encountered Gordon Rice, who performed two songs accompanying himself on the guitar:“Fish and Brewis” (1965, 1: 123) and “The Mine at BaieVerte,” published for the first time in this collection. The use of the guitar was unusual and more of a reflection of the influences of American patterns filtering into the island by way of radio and through the American occupation during World War...

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Molly Bawn (Mary Bawn or Boating on Lough Ree)

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pp. 266-268

In this performance, Ned Rice sang the stanzas, and Ron O’Brien joined in on the chorus. When they finished the song,someone in the room remarked“Good stuff that”(MUNFLA, Acc. 87-157/C11031B).

This gentle Irish lament, otherwise known as the poem “Mary Bawn” or “Boating on Lough Ree,” is attributed to John Keegan Casey (1846–1870). At age eighteen, Casey was working as a schoolteacher from Newtowncashel, County Longford. He met and fell in love with a young woman named Mary Hanley while visiting Lough Lee, a lake in the...

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Morrissey and the Black

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pp. 269-271

Freeman Bennett performed this song at a slow and steady pace, taking over six minutes from beginning to end.

This ballad describes, almost in newspaper style, the blow-by-blow rounds of a bareknuckle boxing match between the Irish American champion boxer John Morrissey (1831–1878) and Ned-oh or Ned the Black.Ives who collected the song in New Brunswick, notes that Morrissey, originally from CountyTipperary, moved toTroy, NewYork, and rose from being a street brawler to world heavyweight champion, eventually rising to state...

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The Mountains of Mourne (Mountains o’ Mourne)

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pp. 272-274

Monica Rossiter sang this highly popularized Irish ballad for Peacock with much feeling. At the end of the recording, someone in the room commented,“That’s a beautiful song” (MUNFLA, Acc. 87-157/C11033B). Mrs. Rossiter informed Peacock that she had heard it while at Mrs. Ron O’Brien’s. Peacock happened to be staying at this home during his visit to the community. Earlier in 1950, MacEdward Leach had also acquired a performance of Monica Rossiter singing “The Mountains of Mourne” (MUNFLA, Acc. 78-054, NFLD 1, tape 7-1; Leach Songs).

The song is attributed to composerWilliam Percy French (1854–1920) of Roscommon,...

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My Bonny Irish Boy (Bonny Irish Boy)

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pp. 275-279

In 1952, while on the island of Fogo, Peacock noted a couple of ballads with similar titles commenting, “they are not really variants; they are completely different songs” (1965, 2: 563). He later published them under the main heading “My Bonny Irish Boy.” There is evidently much confusion regarding these two ballad types, and this is reflected in present day annotations, primarily because of the similarity in the titles, which include “The Bonny Young Irish Boy,” “The Bonny Boy,” “The Bonny Irish Boy,” “My Own Bonny Boy,” and “The Irish Boy,” to name a few. Laws includes both the Foley text, which Peacock had...

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My Father’s Old Sou’wester

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pp. 280-281

The Irene B.Mellon serial radio drama was probably John Mahoney’s source for “My Father’s Old Sou’wester.”William Hollett (1916–2008) composed the text,while Jimmy Ring added the music (Hiscock, 1986: 170, 182; Hiscock, 1991). Created by Jack Withers (1889–1964), the Irene B. Mellon ran from January 24, 1934, to April 29, 1941, first over the radio station VOGY and later over VOCM. The series was successful because, although it drew on the medium of popular culture, it was rooted in local tradition (Hiscock, 1986; Nárvaez and Laba, 1986). People related to the show because the writers drew on local culture and local...

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My Little English Home across the Sea

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pp. 282-283

Rice also performed “My Little English Home across the Sea” for MacEdward Leach. He lists it as“My Little Home across the Sea”(MUNFLA, Acc.78-054,NFLD 1, tape 4-7; Leach Songs). Rice’s Newfoundland rendition appears to be some kind of adaptation of the novelty ethnic song “My Little German Home across the Sea,” attributed to George S. Knight and the comic performer Charlie Collins, who billed himself as a Dutch comedian (Meade, Spottswood, and Meade, 2002: 347). Typical for the period,“My Little German Home” was originally sung in the first person in a quasi-German accent, most likely in some kind of vaudeville setting (“Ethnic Groups and Popular Music.”) It was one of hundreds of popular...

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Nancy of London (Nancy from Yarmouth)

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pp. 284-287

Peacock documented this song four times during his travels, later publishing three examples: an “A” version from Chris Cobb (MS 85) of Barr’d Islands, Fogo, the melody and two stanzas from Kenneth Pink (PEA 126 No. 889) of Rose Blanche, and the melody and one stanza from Becky and Freeman Bennett of St. Paul’s (PEA 94 No. 749) (1965, 2: 568–70; Payne andWalsh, 2005). The fourth example, a rendition by Martha Osmond of Grand Bay (168-1064), which she sings very slowly, appears here for the first time along with the complete text of Kenneth Pink’s more rhythmic full performance of “Fair Nancy.”...

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On the Deck of the Willow Green (Faithful Edgar)

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pp. 288-290

Annie Legge performed “On the Deck of theWillow Green” for Peacock using her pump organ for accompaniment. This is the only song Peacock acquired from this singer. As the field recording reveals, following her performance Annie Green recited stanza eight for Peacock, which she had left out in the performance (MUNFLA, Acc. 87-157/11083B). As she ended the song with the last two lines of stanza nine, it’s possible that Peacock noted down the first two lines from her in a similar manner.

Also known as “Faithful Edgar” or “Faithful Hector,” this song appears to be confined strictly to Newfoundland and Labrador and it may have been locally...

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The Orangemen of Cadiz

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pp. 291-294

As previously discussed with respect to “James McGee” and “John Mitchell,” some songs in a given community are deemed to be part of a private tradition. Songs that may be considered treasonous are often performed only with certain like-minded audiences (Goldstein, 1991). This is the case with “The Orangemen of Cadiz,” which as far as can be ascertained, has never been published, at least not in Canada. After completing the song, George Decker commented to Peacock,“I learned that through a friend of mine a long, long time ago. Now there were a lot of different denominations and you wasn’t allowed to sing it.” Decker also informed Peacock that he had “got in hot water two or three different...

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Our Boys Gave Up Squiddin’ (sung to the tune of the “Squid Jiggin’ Ground”)

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pp. 295-296

This is another example of a locally composed World War II parodic song based on Arthur Scammell’s “Squid Jiggin’ Ground” (Roud 4429). For the full discussion of the use of the “Squid Jiggin’ Ground” for such parodies, see “Hitler’s Song.” Peacock passed the song to Gerald S. Doyle in 1952 for Doyle’s third edition of Old-Time...

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Paddy and the Three English Plagues (Three English Rovers)

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pp. 297-299

This song is best classified as a piece of drinking trickery which takes place on “April Fool’s Day” (Kennedy, 1975: 624), a calendar day traditionally set aside for pranks and practical jokes. In some senses this is also an ethnic joke in the form of a song where the hero “Irish Paddy” has the last laugh. In the 1950s, Kennedy acquired “Campbell the Rover” from Joe Heaney of Carna, Galway, Ireland, and a second version called “Three English Blades” from Pat Kelly of Newry, County Down, Northern Ireland (ibid. 601; 624). A text for “Pat Campbell the Drover” also appears in the Derry Journal’s Old Come-All-Ye’s:The Finest...

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Pats O’Brien

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pp. 300-302

The historical details on which this gruesome Irish ballad is based have yet to surface. The song has been intermittently documented on both sides of the Atlantic. The Cashel ballad collection in Trinity College Library, Dublin contains an undated broadside “The Lamentation of Pat O’Brien for the Murder of Nancy Ryan” (Vol.2, EPB OLSX-1-532_109; White-Cashel Ballads) placing the murder near the town of Sligo. The Greig-Duncan collection contains a similar eight-stanza Scottish version called “Pat O’Brien” dating to 1909 (Shuldham-Shaw and Lyle, 1983, 2: 50)....

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Patrick Power

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pp. 303-305

The lyrics of this song pertain to the execution of Patrick Power, age twenty-one, of Cromogue near Newtownbarry, County Wexford on April 4, 1866, for the murder of his father, Timothy Power, on October 13, 1865, by a pitchfork. The weapon was later found in the barn where Power had hidden it. The events were widely covered in local newspapers (“Execution of Power for the Murder of His Father”;“Parricide in Wexford”). According to these printed accounts, Power was annoyed with his father for ill treatment of his mother. In addition, his father was angry with him for supposedly having a relationship with a local...

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Peter Emberley (Peter Hembly; Peter Amberley)

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pp. 306-308

Annie Walters also performed “Peter Emberley” for Herbert Halpert and John Widdowson in 1966, and for Shirley Dominie in 1978 (MUNFLA, STI, Acc.66-24/C286 and 78-4949/ C 4248A).

This ballad is mainly associated with the lumber-camp song tradition, in which it has been a “favourite ballad of the Maritime lumbermen” (Fowke, 1985: 129). Known variously in oral tradition by such titles as “Peter Emberley,” “Peter Amberley,” “Peter Rambeley,” “Peter Hembly,” Peter Emery” and “Adieu to Prince Edward’s Isle” (Cazden, Haufrecht, and Studer, 1982: 52), it has been well documented in the eastern United States as well as...

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The Prince and the Orphan (The Orphan Girl)

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pp. 309-311

It is likely that this melodramatic ballad dates to the beginning of the nineteenth century. An early antecedent called “The Orphan Girl” (1802–1819), published by J. Pitts, is to be found in the Bodleian Library’s broadside collection [Harding B 25(1429) Broadside Ballads Online]. The first stanza of that broadside is as follows:

An orphan once in doleful plaint
Sang near a great man’s door
In thrilling notes her woes so plaint...

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The Prison(er) of Newfoundland

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pp. 312-314

This song is known as both “The Prisoner of Newfoundland” and “The Prison of Newfoundland.” It’s probable that the song was composed sometime in the mid-nineteenth century. The reference to “Judge Carter” in line three of stanza three likely refers to Peter Weston Carter (1786–1871), who served as chief magistrate in St. John’s from the early 1820s up to his retirement in 1869 (Riggs, 1981). The reference to “The prison situated by the side of a lovely pond” in line one of stanza five is Her Majesty’s Penitentiary, located on the side of Quidi Vidi Lake, in the east end of St. John’s, which was constructed between...

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The Rose in June

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pp. 315-319

Peacock was unlikely to publish “The Rose in June” because of its overt religious content. However, it is a song that has much appeal to local singers. In June 1945, Mrs. Ward Crew of Deer Island, Burgeo sent a request to the Newfoundlander looking for the lyrics for “The Rose in June” and in 1948, Mabel White of Cotrell’s Cove, Notre Dame Bay made a similar request (Your Favourite Songs. Request: “The Rose in June”). MacEdward Leach also collected the song with the title “Andrew Davidson” from John A. McLellan of St. George’s...

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The Roving Newfoundlanders

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pp. 320-322

In 1951, Peacock took an exploratory trip to the town of Grand Bank at the bottom of the Burin Peninsula (Guigné, 2008a: 101-04). The road had just opened up, and he was curious to see what he might discover in the way of folk songs. Although Peacock spent very little time in the area, he encountered Ewart Vallis, who accompanied himself on guitar. Vallis performed two songs for Peacock: “The Roving Newfoundlanders,” presented here, and “Feller from Burgeo” (PEA 4-26), an unpublished version of “Feller from Fortune” or “Lots of Fish in Bonavist’ Harbour” (1965, 1: 54). Peacock was unimpressed with Vallis’s use...

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Save Your Money When You’re Young

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pp. 323-324

This American song is generally associated with the lumberwoods song tradition. The earliest printing appears to be a version from North Dakota,“SaveYour Money When You’re Young” in Rickaby’s Ballads and Songs of the Shanty-Boy (1926: 39–40). As Rickaby poignantly points out, the words of this song undoubtedly moved the “dim spirit-beings of thousands of shanty-boys” who whiled away their wages with little to show for their efforts in later years. From this he concludes,“If a ballad can be defined as ‘a song which tells a story’ then I might feel prompted to call this song a ballad” (Ibid., 199). Beck, who includes...

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The Scolding Wife

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pp. 325-327

This song, which deals humorously with an abusive wife, is well known on both sides of the Atlantic. For comparable texts in the United States, see Gardner and Chickering ([1939] 1967: 432–33), and in England, see Kennedy (1975: 470–71).

“The Scolding Wife” theme turns up in many of MUNFLA’s field collections. Two singers previously interviewed by Peacock performed versions of the song for other collectors. See Andrew O’Brien’s field recording of “The Naggin’Wife” as performed by Ned...

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The Search of the Thomas J.

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pp. 328-329

Kenneth Pink happened to be visiting Amelia Kinslow of Isle aux Morts when Peacock recorded him singing this and several others songs in Kinslow’s kitchen. As with all of the songs Pink performed for Peacock, this one was sung with great rhythm.

Not much is known about the origins of this local song, and there are no other recordings in archival collections. It is not clear what exactly was being smuggled on the Thomas J., but the reference to the French community of Port-au-Port in line three of stanza six...

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The Ship That Never Came (The Gentle Boy)

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pp. 330-331

This sentimental song, also known locally as “The Gentle Boy” and “Daddy’s Ship,” was probably published sometime in the nineteenth century. It has not been widely collected and information is sparse. All of the eleven examples in the Roud Folksong Index are either Canadian or American. Fowke acquired “Why Don’t My Father’s Ship Sail In” (FO 51) from Michael Cuddihey of Hull, Quebec, and “Why Don’t Your Father’s Ship Come In” (FO 36) from Joe Thibadeau of Lindsay, Ontario (Fowke, List of Song Titles). “Why Don’t My Father’s Ship Sail In” was also recorded in Lakehurst, Bobcaygeon, by Newbell Niles...

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The Six Horsepower Coaker

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pp. 332-335

Art Scammell of Change Islands composed “The Six Horsepower Coaker” when he was a young man. It refers specifically to an uncomplicated high compression semi-diesel engine named after William Ford Coaker who, as previously discussed in “Coaker’s Dream,” was the founder of the Fishermen’s Protective Union.

The company manufacturing the engine may have been Loane-Hiltz Engineering Company based in Baltimore (Holmfeld, 1990). Although popularized by Coaker’s Union...

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Skipper George Whitely

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pp. 336-337

This song was composed by Clara (House) Stevens about her experiences as a young girl working for George Carpenter Whitely (1874–1961), a well-known ship’s captain and politician. For several years he spent time at the seal fishery and managed the family business at Bonne Espérance, Quebec. (On this see the song “Concerning One day in Bonay I Spent”). Whitely was elected to the House of Assembly in 1932, where he represented the District of St. Barbe from 1932–1934 (Bates, 1994: 562)....

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The Soldier’s Letter

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pp. 338-340

Following her performance of “The Soldier’s Letter,” Alvina Coles recalled that she left out stanza four. She later sang it to Peacock at the end of the field recording (MUNFLA, Acc. 87-157/C11038B).

Songwriter, singer, and musician Henry “Redd” Stewart (1921–2003) wrote this classic country song during World War II at a time when country music was becoming a “national phenomenon” (Malone, 1968: 185). The United States Army recruited Stewart shortly after the attack on Pearl Harbour in 1941. While stationed in the South Pacific, he wrote “The...

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Someone Has Been There Before

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pp. 341-342

Not much is known about the origin of this comic song. It is known elsewhere in Newfoundland, but appears only in field collections. Leach acquired it in 1951 with the title “I’m a Poor Unfortunate Miserable Man” from Bobby O’Brien of Trepassey (MUNFLA, Acc. 78-054, NFLD 2, tape 8-3), and Goldstein also collected “Someone Has Been There Before” (Pelletier, 1996: 80).

There is at least one recording of the song based on Peacock’s field transcription of John Barker’s performance. Sometime before 1965, Peacock passed this rendition to his...

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The Southern Shore Queen

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pp. 343-345

This locally composed song is attributed to Gertrude Carew Cahill (1916–2004) of Cape Broyle. Peacock recorded it from Ned Rice and Ron O’Brien during his first year of his fieldwork in Newfoundland, later passing the song to Gerald S. Doyle for his third edition of Old-Time Songs of Newfoundland (1955: 55). As Doyle freely distributed his songsters, the song soon gained popularity among singers.In the ensuing years the Peacock-Doyle version was readily recycled into several Newfoundland song collections, many of them associated with marketing. Blondhal included it with the addition of guitar chords in Newfoundlanders...

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The Spanish Lass (TheYoung Spanish Lass;The Indian Lass)

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pp. 346-348

Lenora Stevens Biggin is the daughter of William and Clara Stevens. She was ten years old when Peacock recorded her performing this song. In line one, Stevens uses the word“barge,” a reference to a flat-bottomed freight boat. In most renditions the vessel is a “barque.”

Locally, the song is also known as “Barque in the Harbour.” This version is comparable to “The Young Spanish Lass” published by Fowke in Traditional Songs from Ontario (1965: 148–49) and in Penguin Book of Canadian Folksongs (1973: 126–27). Fowke’s source was singer Albert Simms, originally from McCallum Harbour, Hermitage Bay, who traces his...

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The Spanish Main (I Was Just Sixteen)

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pp. 349-353

The “Spanish Main” is the northern coast of Spanish America, adjacent to the Caribbean Sea.

Peacock collected three versions of this song,later publishing a fourteen-stanza rendition by John Mahoney (MS 109) of Stock Cove (1965, 3: 720–21). He chose not to print these versions, noting, “Three Newfoundland variants of this didactic ballad are very similar in text and tune […] the preoccupation with sin would seem to suggest a zealous missionary influence, but in other respects the ballad is normal enough to pass the test of authenticity” (Ibid., 721)

The song appears to be confined to Newfoundland. In 1921, Greenleaf collected a ten-stanza rendition called “IWas Just Sixteen” from George Roberts of Sally’s Cove (1933:...

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Ten Weary Years (The Miner’s Dream of Home)

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pp. 354-356

The original title of this popular music hall song was “The Miner’s Dream of Home,” written and composed (c. 1891) by Will J. Godwin (1859–1913), with contributions by Leo Dryden (1863–1939) (Kilgariff, 1998: 441; The Miner’s Dream of Home). Dryden (George D.Wheeler) who was known in his time as the “Kipling of the Halls,” first performed the song at the Oxford Music Hall in London (Russell, 1987: 117; MacQueen-Pope, 1950: 149). London’s newspaper the Era pronounced Dryden’s performance the “success of the season”(“Mr. Leo Dryden”). This sentimental song yearning for the motherland was popular for the period because Britain was involved with the Second Boer War and music such...

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There Lived an Old Woman in Dover (Eggs and Marrow Bones)

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pp. 357-359

This humorous ditty about adultery, attempted murder, and a man outwitting his wife, is well documented on both sides of the Atlantic. Roud and Bishop note that it was already in oral circulation in 1840 (2012: 448). It is also known by a variety of titles, including “Eggs and Marrow Bones” (Purslow, 1965: 55),“The Old Woman from Boston” (Cazden, Haufrecht, and Studer, 1982: 520),“An Old Woman’s Story” (Cox, [1925]1963: 464),“The OldWoman of BlighterTown” (Kennedy, 1975: 465),“The Auld Man and the Churnstaff” (Huntington, 1990: 507), “The Old Woman of Slapsadam” (Laws, 1957: 274), and “Marrowbones” (Ó Cróinín, 2000: 145–46)....

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Thomas and Molly (Thomas and Nancy)

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pp. 360-362

This old British broadside ballad, more often known as “Thomas and Nancy,” dates to the early part of the nineteenth century. For early examples in the Bodleian Library’s broadside ballad collection, see “Thomas and Nancy” (c. 1813–1838) printed by Catnach, and see “Thomas and Nancy” (c. 1819–1844) [Harding B11(3473); Harding B 11(4123), Broadside Ballads Online]. A third, undated example (printed by H. Paul of 22 Brick-lane, Spitalfieds) contains both “Thomas and Nancy” and the song “A Woman’s the Pride of the Land” [Harding B11(3800)], also in the present volume.

In addition to this rendition by James Heaney, Peacock acquired versions from Mary...

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Timber for the Bridge at St. Paul’s

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pp. 363-364

This occupational song operates on the level of a moniker song as discussed with “Five-Boss Highway” earlier in this edition. It reflects local anxiety in the community concerning poor leadership in directing the construction of a bridge over St. Paul’s river. This is revealed directly in the third stanza of the song. The bridge crossing over St. Paul’s inlet was built in 1911, but it later washed away with the ice. As one local resident of St. Paul’s recalls: “The bridge didn’t survive long. The following spring when the bay ice started to melt and started moving out fast with the strong tides and currents it took out the bridge also” (William Bennett, Email to author, 26 Aug. 2016). A new bridge of steel was eventually built in 1962....

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When We Were Sweet Sixteen (Now I’m Sixty-Four)

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pp. 365-366

This lyrical song, also known as “Now I’m Sixty-Four” and “Now I’m 64,” is well loved in the province. The Discography of Newfoundland and Labrador includes many recordings under both titles. Jim Rice also performed it in 1950 as “When We Were Sweet Sixteen” for MacEdward Leach (MUNFLA, Acc. 78-054, NFLD 1, tape 4-13; Leach Songs). The Leach and Peacock field recordings are the earliest documented examples of the song, thus far. For a much later field recording at MUNFLA, see “Now I’m Sixty-Four” as performed by George Earle of Change Islands for Wilf Wareham and J. Kellum (STI, 77-264/C4647).

Newfoundland musican and singer Harry Hibbs (1942–1989) first recorded the song...

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Woman’s the Joy and the Pride of the Land

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pp. 367-369

Freeman Bennett told Peacock that he had learned “Woman’s the Joy and the Pride of the Land” from his mother Rosanna Payne Bennett forty-five years previous. In the 1960s, Bennett also informed told Halpert and Widdowson that he had learned many songs from his mother who “is reputed to have known 300 of them” (1996, 2: 1064).

This Old World British ballad about courtship and marriage is rare on both sides of the Atlantic, and there are few examples. A three-stanza text of “Woman’s the Joy and the Pride of the Land” by Miss Bell Robertson of Scotland appears in the Greig-Duncan collection (Shuldham-Shaw and McNaughtan, 1995, 5: 579). Greenleaf and Mansfield...

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The Wreck of the Ethie

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pp. 370-372

The S.S. Ethie was built in Scotland for Reid Newfoundland, and as one of the Alphabet Fleet, it operated as a passenger and freight vessel on the island’s western coastal service, travelling from Battle Harbour on the southern coast of Labrador to Bonne Bay (Hanrahan, 2007). On December 3, 1919, the Ethie left Humbermouth, making its second-last run of the season northward to Battle Harbour. On December 11, on the return voyage, the vessel was making its way from Port Saunders to Bonne Bay when it ran into a heavy gale. The Ethie was lost off Martin’s Point a little over 6 kilometres north of Sally’s Cove on the Great Northern Peninsula. With the assistance of settlers nearby and some fast thinking by Captain...

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The Wreck of the Green Rocks

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pp. 373-374

This song could have been composed either in Newfoundland or Nova Scotia. The details pertain to the Canadian dragger Green Rock. The vessel was built by John McKay and christened by Ruth Mills, the daughter of Captain Jack Mills, and launched from Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, in December 1949 (Eleanor Robertson Smith. Email to author). Measuring 148 feet long, 26 feet in the beam, and 11.6 feet in depth, with 312 horsepower, the vessel was fitted with all the latest safety devices and navigational equipment, including radio, telephone, and a Bendix sounding machine. With a crew of twenty-eight and twelve dories, she was out to fish south of Halifax for General Sea Foods from February 21 to April, when...

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The Wreck of the Old Spike (The Wreck of the Semmity)

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pp. 375-378

This shipwreck ballad, also known as “The Huzwhite,” “The Old Smite/Smythe,” and the “Old Snipe/Spike”(Halley, 1989: 209) is well documented in Newfoundland. This is reflected in the three versions Peacock acquired, which were all under different titles. In addition to this example, he recorded “Wreck of the Sennity” from George Decker (PEA 148 No. 980) and “Wreck of the Semmity” (PEA 100 No. 776) from Everett Bennett. Peacock eventually published a full text of Bennett’s rendition and one stanza of Decker’s version in Outports (1965, 3: 983–84; Payne and Walsh, 2005), noting,“A third variant by Mrs.Wallace Kinslow of Isle aux Morts calls the vessel by a completely different name, Old Spike. All three tunes...

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Young Ettie

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pp. 379-382

This relatively obscure song does not appear in any song publications, local or otherwise. It has been reported in two field collections listed in MUNFLA’s Song Title Index. One is a version from St. Shott’s, as performed by Thomas Finlay for Tom Nemec in 1969 (MUNFLA, STI, Acc 69-36/C592). The given title is simply “One Morning in May as the Sun Brightly Shone.” The first stanza of this song is as follows:

One morning in May as the sun brightly shone.
In Gadstone fair I strayed from my home,
I spied a fair maiden whom I did adore...

The Singers: Biographical Sketches

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pp. 383-402

Bibliography

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pp. 403-430

Index of First Lines

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pp. 431-438

Back Cover

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