Cover

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Half Title, Series Info, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

Illustrations, Maps, and Tables

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pp. ix-x

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xvi

My journey while writing this book has been long and circuitous, but I have been fortunate to meet and work with extraordinarily generous and smart people along the way. Words cannot fully express how much I appreciate the help, advice, and friendship that I have received over the years, ...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-20

In 1883, the San Antonio Daily Express published a series of letters written by special correspondent Hans Mickle. The reporter was exploring parts of the new transcontinental railway that ran across the American Southwest, connecting San Francisco and Los Angeles to New Orleans. ...

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1. Empires and Immigrants

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pp. 21-62

In August 1850, John Russell Bartlett left New York City in search of the U.S.-Mexico border. Traveling by ship, the newly appointed U.S. boundary commissioner journeyed around the Eastern Seaboard of the United States, briefly stopping in Havana and New Orleans, until he reached Indianola, ...

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2. A Promiscuous Crowd

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pp. 63-94

On Friday night, October 6, 1893, policemen and state rangers in El Paso raided the residences of a number of “colored men and Mexicans,” as reported by the El Paso Daily Times. As a result of the raid, seven “negro” men and five Mexican women were arrested. One young Mexican girl was released on bail “on account of her having a very young infant in her arms,” ...

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3. “Hunting for Chinamen”

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pp. 95-123

On the night of February 17, 1892, U.S. customs inspector George Duval noticed two men crossing the international bridge between El Paso, Texas, and Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua. Something about these men seemed odd, for Duval left his office to question them. The first man he stopped was Mexican and had nothing to declare. ...

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4. Forged in Revolution

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pp. 124-157

On May 8, 1911, Francisco Madero and his army of followers descended on Ciudad Juárez and initiated nearly a decade of bloody civil war in Mexico. Two days after beginning their attack, they forced Porfirio Díaz’s army into retreat and Madero proclaimed Juárez the interim capital of Mexico. ...

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5. “Razas no gratas” and the Color Bar at the Border

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pp. 158-196

In a letter dated May 15, 1935, U.S.-born poet and novelist Langston Hughes wrote from Mexico City: “For the past four or five years now, . . . Negroes, tourists or otherwise, have been having difficulties about visiting Mexico, and in several cases have not been permitted to pass, or have had to put up a bond—which is never required of white tourists. ...

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Epilogue

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pp. 197-202

In November 1993, the editors of Time magazine devoted an entire issue to the dramatic transformations in American society following the 1965 passage of the Hart-Cellar Act, which had finally abolished the national origin quotas introduced in the 1920s and opened the way for increased immigration from Asia and Latin America. ...

Notes

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pp. 203-260

Bibliography

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pp. 261-288

Index

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pp. 289-302