Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xiv

When my family asked about my current book project, they were mildly disappointed. A book on violence? Didn’t you already write a book on violence? Yes, I must plead guilty. In an earlier book I applied a geographic perspective to the study of (mostly) direct violence; at the time, I believed that the geography discipline (as a whole) was largely silent on the subject of direct, interpersonal violence. In this book I remain concerned with...

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1. The Abstraction of Violence

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pp. 1-32

Jessica Kate Williams was murdered on May 23, 2003.1 Twenty- two years old and homeless, Jessica (an African American woman) had been living in a street camp in Portland, Oregon, with a number of other runaway youths, most of whom came from white, middle- class homes. Jessica, in many ways, was different from the other youths. For one thing, there was her size. At six feet, four inches tall and weighing 230 pounds, Jessica...

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2. Materialism and Mode of Production

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pp. 33-78

Violence has no materiality in and of itself. By making this statement I do not imply that people are not hit, slapped, stabbed, shot, or left to die. But these are particular concrete actions (or inactions) that may or may not be considered violent. Therefore, in order to theorize the broader salience of violence in society one must abstract violence from dominant modes of production that give rise to— or contextualize— particular actions...

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3. The Market Logics of Letting Die

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pp. 79-130

Thus far I have argued my first proposition, that violence is a general abstraction, and my second proposition, that abstractions of violence must be materially grounded within concrete modes of production. In this chapter I develop my third and most specific proposition, that, under capitalism, violence is abstracted according to a particular assemblage of market logics, a specific valuation of— and indifference to— life. As Robert...

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4. The Violence of Redundancy

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pp. 131-198

Zygmunt Bauman writes about “redundancy” in contemporary society. Such a condition, according to Bauman, “whispers permanence and hints at the ordinariness of the condition. It names a condition without offering a ready- to- use antonym. It suggests a new shape of current normality and the shape of things that are imminent and bound to stay as they are.” He continues, arguing that “to be ‘redundant’ means to...

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5. The Reality of Violence

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pp. 199-212

Mark Kurlansky effectively highlights the difficulties with articulating the concept of nonviolence. As an idea, a practice, or condition, nonviolence is understood by what it is not. Nonviolence is the absence, or lack, or even opposite of violence. A similar conundrum exists for the concept of peace. Peace is widely (and erroneously) understood as the absence of war. And yet, as many commentators have noted, a society not at war is not necessarily peaceful....

Notes

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pp. 213-234

Bibliography

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pp. 235-250

Index

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pp. 251-255