Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-4

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 5-6

Contributors

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 7-8

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 9-18

While various studies have touched on the question, or dealt with some of its aspects,1 a comprehensive history of antisemitism in Canada has never been written. This book does not fill the...

read more

1. Antisemitism and Anti-Judaism in Pre-Confederation Canada

Richard Menkis

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 19-46

The history of the Jews in Canada prior to Confederation has been unjustly ignored. Certainly, the relative size of the Jewish population was small; in 1871, the Jews constituted less than .03 percent of the total...

read more

2. From Stereotype to Scapegoat:Anti-Jewish Sentiment in French Canada from Confederation to World War I

Michael Brown

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 47-74

Seldom, in the first quarter-century after Confederation, did Jews rise to the forefront of the French-Canadian consciousness. In 1867 there were only about 1000 Jews in all of Canada. The Jewish community was too small to be considered in the constitutional...

read more

3. Goldwin Smith: Victorian Canadian Antisemite

Gerald Tulchinsky

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 75-100

Most of those who read the works of Goldwin Smith are impressed by the brilliance of his intellect and the enormous range of his interest in and knowledge of the political and intellectual world of Britain, the United States and Canada during the last...

read more

4. Antisemitic Dreyfusards: The Confused Western-Canadian Press

Phyllis M. Senese

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 101-120

In the late summer of 1899, worldwide attention was riveted on the French provincial city of Rennes, the scene of the second court-martial of Captain Alfred Dreyfus. At the time of his arrest in 1894, it was generally only the scurrilous antisemitic press...

read more

5. Antisemitism in Ontario: The Twentieth Century

Stephen Speisman

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 121-142

Mid-nineteenth-century Ontario was a society that prized what it perceived to be the best characteristics of British civilization: religion, monarchy, respectability, industry and charity. Those few Jews who had settled in the province during...

read more

6. Interlude of Hostility: Judeo-Christian Relations in Quebec in the Interwar Period, 1919-39

Pierre Anctil

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 143-174

Any study of antisemitism in Quebec in the interwar period has to take into account a number of factors that have little to do with either Jews or Judaism. A small minority in the total population, and a community that, for the most part, was formed...

read more

7. Politics, Religion and Antisemitism in Alberta, 1880-1950

Howard Palmer

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 175-204

Although the Keegstra affair has drawn attention to antisemitism in rural Alberta, its provincial roots have never been fully explored. Because of the complexity of public attitudes...

read more

8. The Shadow of Evil: Nazism and Canadian Protestantism

Marilyn F. Nefsky

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 205-234

"The future of humanity lies in the recognition of the shadow."1 During the 1930s, Nazism cast an ominous shadow over many nations, including Canada. Many Canadians, overcome with inertia, xenophobia or nativism, were affected...

read more

9. The Keegstra Affair

Alan Davies

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 235-256

The salient facts are simple: on April 9, 1985, James Keegstra, a smalltown, high school social studies teacher in Alberta, was brought to trial in Red Deer for wilfully promoting...

read more

10. The Zundel Affair

Manuel Prutschi

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 257-286

On November 18, 1983, Mrs. Sabina Citron of the Canadian Holocaust Remembrance Association went before a justice of the peace to swear out charges against Ernst Ziindel under the "false news" section of Canada's...

read more

11. Jewish-Ukrainian Relations in Canada Since World War II and the Nazi War Criminal Issue

Harold Troper and Morton Weinfeld

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 287-308

In 1971 the Government of Canada declared its support for multiculturalism. This policy bestowed symbolic recognition on ethnicity as a positive value in the evolution of the Canadian identity. Some observers belittled the move as a cynical...

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 309-312