Cover

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Title Page, Series Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-v

Contents

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pp. vii-vii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xi

It is with a grateful and humble na‘au that I thank my kūpuna for the wealth of knowledge and legacy of excellence with which they gifted succeeding generations. I thank my mother, Maryann Nākoa Barros, who has been my strongest supporter on this journey, giving selflessly of her time and energy so that I could complete this book. ...

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Introduction

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pp. xiii-xix

My daughter, Kahakai, was born at the Maui Memorial Hospital in the kau (season) of Ho‘oilo in the mahina (month) of Kaulua on the pō mahina (night) of Akua. I would have preferred to have given birth to her on our kulāiwi (ancestral homeland) on the mokupuni (island) of Maui in the moku (district) of ...

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Chapter 1

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pp. 1-24

Mo‘olelo (historical accounts), especially those cosmogonic in nature, form the foundation for a Kanaka (Native Hawaiian) geography, illuminating the genealogical connection that Kānaka share with the ‘āina (land; that which feeds). Mele ko‘ihonua (cosmogonic genealogies) are crucial to understanding ...

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Chapter 2

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pp. 25-45

Ancestral Kānaka placed great importance on their personal space, as evidenced by the varying degrees of invisible boundaries that surrounded one’s body. The level of intimacy and interaction that Kānaka enjoyed with each other in ancestral times was directly impacted by their societal status and genealogical lineage.1 Wearing someone else’s clothes, for instance, was largely ...

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Chapter 3

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pp. 46-64

Ka pae ‘āina Hawai‘i is 1,200 miles north of the Pikoowākea, also known as ke alanui polohiwa a Kāne (the equator).1 Ka pae ‘āina Hawai‘i is sometimes referred to as Hoakalani (also known as Hoakaailani) because of its resemblance to the moon phase by the same name.2 Others use the name ...

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Chapter 4

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pp. 65-93

Ancestrally, Kānaka did not have maps in the form of written representations of the world; instead they utilized “performance cartographies” to reference their constructed places, legitimize their existence, and reinforce their legacies.1 Such cartographic representations were expressed in many ways ...

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Chapter 5

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pp. 94-114

Kānaka have been able to navigate throughout the Pacific for thousands of years by sensing subtle changes in our environment. We navigate by observing the stars, sun, moon, clouds, ocean currents, birds, and sea life; listening to the rhythm of the ocean as it hits the sides of the canoe; and feeling the way ...

Notes

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pp. 115-141

Glossary

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pp. 143-158

Bibliography

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pp. 159-164

Index

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pp. 165-180

Back Cover

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