Cover

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pp. 1-1

Praise, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. 2-9

Contents

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pp. vii-11

Tables and Figures

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pp. ix-13

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Preface and Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xvi

To some observers, the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s actions during the 1960s—most prominently its counterintelligence programs (COINTELPROs) against suspected Communists, civil rights and black power advocates, Klan adherents, and antiwar activists—were an aberration...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-14

On June 11, 1968, the FBI’s Newark field office was developing ideas to promote a negative, and outwardly deviant, image of the nation’s largest New Left student organization, Students for a Democratic Society (SDS). The agent in charge of the Newark office submitted a proposal...

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1. Counterintelligence Activities and the FBI

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pp. 15-41

At the beginning of the twentieth century, the U.S. Department of Justice—the parent agency of what would later become the Federal Bureau of Investigation—was perhaps best known for its inability to effectively undertake any investigations at all. In a popular anecdote...

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2. The Movements

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pp. 42-78

The Columbia University chapter of Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) began modestly in the spring of 1965, largely through the efforts of three students inspired by the SDS-sponsored antiwar march on Washington—John Fuerst, Harvey Bloom, and Michael Neumann...

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3. The Organization of the FBI: Constructing White Hate and New Left Threats

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pp. 79-108

As FBI lore would have it, an agent from the New York field office was grazed in the leg by a bullet in a brief shoot-out with a fugitive. He required only routine medical care, but the next morning, J. Edgar Hoover misspoke at a civic function honoring the agent by lamenting...

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4. Acting against the White Hate and New Left Threats

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pp. 109-145

Alabama, May 14, 1961. A bus carrying both black and white passengers—part of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE)–sponsored “Freedom Rides” designed to test a federal ruling prohibiting segregation in terminals serving interstate buses—pulled into the Trailways...

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5. Wing Tips in Their Midst: The Impact of COINTELPRO

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pp. 146-180

If the impact of COINTELPRO could be assessed simply by the state of its targets by the early 1970s, then the Bureau’s efforts were highly successful. To the consternation of many early SDS leaders, who had sought to build a “new” movement as a corrective to the out-of-touch...

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6. Beyond COINTELPRO

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pp. 181-216

The FBI’s efforts to repress COINTELPRO targets surfaced publicly after the release of documents stolen from its resident agency in Media, Pennsylvania, in 1971, but this was not the first event of its kind. In 1949 Justice Department employee Judith Coplon was accused...

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7. The Future Is Now: Counter/Intelligence Activities in the Age of Global Terrorism

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pp. 217-231

The start of the twenty-first century marks a period of perhaps unprecedented public scrutiny of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. While the agency was subject to considerable public reevaluation late in Hoover’s life, its image during those “bad old days” (as some of...

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Appendix A. A Typology of COINTELPRO Actions

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pp. 233-251

More than twelve thousand pages of internal FBI memos—the entire publicly released output of the FBI’s COINTELPROs against “White Hate Groups” and the New Left—make up the body of data used in this study. Within these pages are 5,527 memos, each representing communication between field offices and...

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Appendix B. Organizational Processes and COINTELPRO Outcomes

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pp. 252-272

In chapter 3 I argue that the allocation of COINTELPRO activity was closely tied to patterns of communication within the FBI. Specifically, I focus on the exchange of memos between national headquarters and individual field offices, showing that protest groups’ visibility at the national level was the key prerequisite...

Appendix C. COINTELPRO Targets

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pp. 273-284

Notes

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pp. 285-342

References

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pp. 343-356

Index

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pp. 357-366