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The Civil Rights movement of the 1960s seemed to mark a historical turning point in advancing the American dream of equal opportunity for all citizens, regardless of race. Yet 50 years on, racial inequality remains a troubling fact of life in American society and its causes are highly contested. In The American Non-dilemma, sociologist Nancy DiTomaso convincingly argues that America’s enduring racial divide is sustained more by whites’ preferential treatment of members of their own social networks than by overt racial discrimination. Drawing on research from sociology, political science, history, and psychology, as well as her own interviews with a cross-section of non-Hispanic whites, DiTomaso provides a comprehensive examination of the persistence of racial inequality in the post-Civil Rights era. DiTomaso sets out to answer a fundamental question: if overt institutionalized racism has largely receded in the United States, why does racial inequality remain a national problem? Taking Gunnar Myrdal’s classic work on America’s racial divide, The American Dilemma, as her departure point, DiTomaso focuses on “the white side of the race line.” To do so, she interviewed a sample of working-class whites about their life histories, political views, and general outlook on racial inequality in America. She finds that while the vast majority of whites profess strong support for civil rights and equal opportunity regardless of race, they continue to pursue their own group-based advantage, especially in the labor market. This “opportunity hoarding,” as DiTomaso calls it, leads to substantially improved life outcomes for whites due to their greater access to social resources from family, neighborhoods, schools, churches, and other institutions with which they are engaged. At the same time, the subjects of her study continue to harbor strong reservations about public policies—such as affirmative action—intended to ameliorate racial inequality. In effect, they accept the principles of civil rights but not the implementation of policies that would bring about greater racial equality. DiTomaso also examines how whites understand the persistence of racial inequality in a society where whites are, on average, the advantaged racial group. Most whites see themselves as part of the solution rather than part of the problem with regard to racial inequality, but, due to the unacknowledged favoritism they demonstrate toward other whites, DiTomaso finds that they are at best uncertain allies in the fight for racial inequality. Weaving together research on both race and class, along with the life experiences of DiTomaso’s interview subjects, The American Non-dilemma provides a compelling exploration of how racial inequality is reproduced in today’s society, how people come to terms with the issue in their day-to-day experiences, and what these trends may signify in the contemporary political landscape.

Table of Contents

  1. Frontmatter
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  1. Title Page
  2. p. 3
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  1. Copyright
  2. p. 4
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. Tables and Figures
  2. pp. vii-ix
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  1. About the Author
  2. pp. xi-12
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xiii-xv
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  1. Prologue
  2. pp. xvii-xxv
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  1. 1. Introduction: Racial Inequality Without Racism
  2. pp. 1-45
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  1. 2. Jobs, Opportunities, and Fairness: The Stakes of Equal Opportunity
  2. pp. 46-66
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  1. 3. Community, Networks, and Social Capital
  2. pp. 67-100
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  1. 4. The American Dream: Individualism and Inequality
  2. pp. 101-136
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  1. 5. The Transformation of Post–Civil Rights Politics: Race, Religion, Class, and Culture
  2. pp. 137-173
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  1. 6. The White Electorate: The White Working Class, Religious Conservatives, Professionals, and the Disengaged
  2. pp. 174-219
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  1. 7. Government, Taxes, and Welfare
  2. pp. 220-255
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  1. 8. Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity: Changes in Access to Education and Jobs for Women, African Americans, and Immigrants
  2. pp. 256-308
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  1. 9. Conclusion: Myrdal’s Dilemma and the American Non-Dilemma
  2. pp. 309-338
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  1. Appendix A
  2. pp. 339-351
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  1. Appendix B
  2. pp. 352-364
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 365-375
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  1. References
  2. pp. 377-389
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 391-403
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781610447898
Related ISBN
9780871540805
MARC Record
OCLC
844727829
Pages
384
Launched on MUSE
2013-05-20
Language
English
Open Access
No
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