Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Table of Contents

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Tables

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p. vii

Maps and Figures

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p. ix

Contributors

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pp. xi-xiii

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Acknowledgments

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p. xv

This book is a product of the 26th Indonesia Update Conference, held at the Australian National University (ANU) on 19–20 September 2008. This conference is held annually under the auspices of the Indonesia Project and the Department of Political and Social Change, both in the...

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1. Indonesia as an Archipelago: Managing Islands, Managing the Seas

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pp. 1-27

Indonesia is the world’s largest archipelagic state. By the latest official count, the archipelago consists of 18,108 islands, which lie scattered between the mountainous island of Breueh in the west and tiny Sibir Island in Humboldt Bay (Teluk Yos Sudarso) in the east, and between...

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2. Becoming an Archipelagic State: The Juanda Declaration of 1957 and the ‘Struggle’ to Gain International Recognition of the Archipelagic Principle

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pp. 28-48

One of the fundamental features of Indonesia is that it is an archipelagic state. Large-format maps of Indonesia usually show the straight baselines that join the outermost points of the outermost islands, thereby enclosing within a single entity the thousands of islands that make up...

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3. Indonesia’s Maritime Boundaries

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pp. 49-58

Indonesia is the largest archipelagic state in the world. Its vast maritime area of 5.8 million square kilometres consists of 0.3 million square kilometres of territorial sea, 2.8 million square kilometres of archipelagic waters and 2.7 million square kilometres of exclusive economic zone...

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4. Indonesia’s Archipelagic Sea Lanes

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pp. 59-69

At the time of independence, the Indonesian state inherited all former Dutch territories in the Indonesian archipelago, from the island of Rondo to the northwest of Aceh to Merauke in Papua (see Map 1.1 on page 2). With this territory, Indonesia also inherited, in accordance with...

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5. Extending Indonesia? Opportunities and Challenges related to the Definition of Indonesia’s Extended Continental Shelf Rights

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pp. 70-93

This chapter examines issues related to Indonesia’s continental shelf and, in particular, those areas of continental shelf extending seaward of the 200-nautical-mile limit of Indonesia’s exclusive economic zone (EEZ), which may form part of its legal continental shelf. Such areas...

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6. Indonesian Port Sector Reform and the 2008 Shipping Law

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pp. 94-116

As the world’s largest archipelagic nation, Indonesia requires a well-developed and efficiently run ports sector. This is because producer competitiveness in national and international markets, internal distribution efficiency and, more generally, national economic cohesiveness...

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7. Piracy and Armed Robbery against Ships in Indonesian Waters

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pp. 117-133

The Indonesian archipelago sits astride key shipping routes that carry a large share of the world’s seaborne trade between the Indian and Pacific oceans. Most international interest in maritime security in recent years has focused on the Malacca and Singapore straits, but shipping...

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8. The Indonesian Maritime Security Coordinating Board

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pp. 134-145

Indonesia’s archipelagic character means that its seas are a strategic resource of immense importance. The seas function as a means to unite the nation, as a means of transportation, as a means of defence and security, and as a means of diplomacy. They are also a source of...

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9. Marine Safety in Indonesian Waters

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pp. 146-156

Managing the safety of those who go to sea in Indonesian waters is an important task of the Indonesian government. In the past, Indonesia did not enjoy a good reputation in this field, but today the government is making an increased effort to uphold international marine safety...

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10. Governance in Indonesia’s Marine Protected Areas: A Case Study of Komodo National Park

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pp. 157-171

The governance of marine protected areas (MPAs) in Indonesia has undergone major changes over the past half-century. The system of centralized, technocratic management used in the 1970s and 1980s has since given way to a more community-focused approach. In the early...

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11. Rising to the Challenge of Providing Legal Protection for the Indonesian Coastal and Marine Environment

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pp. 172-194

Indonesia’s marine resources have been severely affected by human actions such as overfishing, destructive fishing methods, clearing of mangrove forests and uncontrolled discharge of industrial and domestic waste into rivers and the sea (State Minister for the Environment...

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12. Legal and Illegal Indonesian Fishing in Australian Waters

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pp. 195-220

I should properly begin my narrative in 1728. This was the year in which a Dutch East India Company officer in Kupang first reported seeing Bajau Laut fishermen, with a fleet of some 40 small boats, gathering trepang on the south coast of the island of Rote. The date thus marks the...

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13. Fluid Boundaries: Modernity, Nation and Identity in the Riau Islands

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pp. 221-237

The archipelagic concept (wawasan nusantara) has been central to Indonesian nation building, because the concept of Indonesia is predicated on clear territorial boundaries that encompass both land (tanah) and water (air). This concept was first articulated through the Juanda...

Index

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pp. 239-247