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summary
Quartararo begins by describing how Abbé de l’Epée promoted the education of deaf students with sign language, an approach supported by the French revolutionary government, which formally established the Paris Deaf Institute in 1791. In the early part of the nineteenth century, the school’s hearing director, Roch-Ambroise-Auguste Bébian, advocated the use of sign language even while the institute’s physician Dr. Jean-Marc-Gaspard Itard worked to discredit signing.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Frontmatter
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  1. Contents
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  1. Preface
  2. pp. ix-xiii
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  1. Acknowledgments
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  1. Part One: The Context
  2. p. 1
  1. Overview: Curriculum and Instruction in General Education and in Education of Deaf Learners
  2. pp. 3-13
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  1. Selection of Curriculum: A Philosophical Position
  2. pp. 15-25
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  1. Part Two: The Content
  2. p. 27
  1. Mathematics Education and the Deaf Learner
  2. pp. 29-40
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  1. Print Literacy: The Acquisition of Reading and Writing Skills
  2. pp. 41-55
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  1. Teaching Science
  2. pp. 57-74
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  1. Revisiting the Role of Physical Education for Deaf Children
  2. pp. 75-66
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  1. The Social Studies Curriculum
  2. pp. 67-91
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  1. Providing Itinerant Services
  2. pp. 93-111
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  1. Teaching About Deaf Culture
  2. pp. 113-126
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  1. Students With Multiple Disabilities
  2. pp. 127-143
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  1. School-to-Work Transitions
  2. pp. 145-158
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  1. Part Three: Instructional Considerations Across the Curriculum
  2. p. 159
  1. Individual Assessment and Educational Planning: Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students Viewed Through Meaningful Contexts
  2. pp. 161-177
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  1. Optimizing Academic Performance of Deaf Students:Access, Opportunities, and Outcomes
  2. pp. 179-200
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  1. Cognitive Strategy Instruction: A Permeating Principle
  2. pp. 201-206
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  1. Instructional and Practical Communication:ASL and English-Based Signing in the Classroom
  2. pp. 207-220
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  1. New Strategies to Address Old Problems:Web-Based Technologies, Resources, and Applicationsto Enhance Deaf Education
  2. pp. 221-242
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  1. Part Four: Final Comments
  2. p. 243
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  1. Summary
  2. pp. 245-246
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 247-251
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 253-261
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781563683749
Related ISBN
9781563682858
MARC Record
OCLC
191726708
Pages
278
Launched on MUSE
2012-08-22
Language
English
Open Access
No
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