Abstract

abstract:

The paper offers an analysis of narratives (published materials and interviews) by older adults who were born to German mothers raped by Red Army soldiers at the end of WWII. The author focuses on how these now older adults narrate their experiences of growing up with stigmatization and rejection, how they construct their identity through the narrative process, and where we can locate their resilience. The acting out of trauma is expressed in parallel to working through it, a process in which the construction of a meaningful self and of an acceptable image of the unknown father plays an important role. The paper also reflects on what these very personal narratives can tell us about the political culture and discourses of their national community, how they deconstruct homogenous national identity, and how they complicate narratives of war and violence.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
2164-8646
Print ISSN
0149-7952
Pages
pp. 311-329
Launched on MUSE
2020-05-29
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.