Abstract

Abstract:

The Dutch crisis of 1787 was a brief event that had a significant impact on the American debate over the ratification of the Constitution. First, the threat of a European war led Americans to consider the response of the United States as a neutral power. Second, the collapse of the Dutch republic led Americans to seek lessons for their own republic. The Federalists saw the Dutch crisis as further evidence of the inadequacy of confederations, and thus a reason to approve a stronger central government, as provided by the Constitution. The Antifederalists believed the Dutch crisis demonstrated the danger of a strong executive, and was an argument against the Constitution.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1553-0620
Print ISSN
0275-1275
Pages
pp. 267-295
Launched on MUSE
2020-05-28
Open Access
No
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