Abstract

ABSTRACT:

Coetzee's grammar of provisionality in Disgrace is the basis for its political and ethical claims. Disgrace challenges conceptions of the future that do not question their foundation, and language that, as he writes elsewhere, "does not as one of its habitual motions glance back skeptically at its premises." If Coetzee's first post-apartheid novel looks to a future, it does so with foreboding, warning of discourses situating themselves teleologically toward a fixed vision of the future.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1534-7303
Print ISSN
0040-4691
Pages
pp. 97-121
Launched on MUSE
2020-02-21
Open Access
No
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