Abstract

Abstract:

This article examines the force and limitations of genealogy in order to develop a practice of counter-history that is capable of both overcoming its inherent problems and providing a more trenchant mode of critico-historical engagement. Using Foucault's well-known essay on Nietzsche as its methodological centerpiece, it begins by elucidating the latter's powerful contribution to the historical analysis of values, while also foregrounding the quasi-naturalized morality of genealogy that structures it. Against this backdrop, it examines Foucault's symptomatological distinction between two opposed and normativized conceptions of origin in Nietzsche—Herkunft and Ursprung—in order to both explicate Foucault's unique appropriation of Nietzschean genealogy and demonstrate its limits through the striking fact that this originary textual symptom of "properly Nietzschean" genealogy does not actually exist in the text. The remainder of the article draws on certain genealogical resources while challenging the historical order undergirding them in order to propose an alternative logic of history that takes into account its constitutive multidimensionality and the multiplicity of agencies at work in any conjuncture. It dismantles, in this way, the very framework that renders historical origins possible, as well as streamlined moral narratives of genealogical inversion, thereby parting ways with the moralities of genealogy in favor of the politicization of values.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1092-311X
Print ISSN
2572-6633
Pages
pp. 85-119
Launched on MUSE
2020-01-29
Open Access
No
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