Abstract

Abstract:

Undersea surveillance systems are proliferating across the world at a rate unprecedented since the Cold War. The central components of these systems are arrays of hydrophones fixed to the ocean floor that convert the underwater acoustic environment into graphic readouts. Machine sensing not only allows states to project sovereignty into the ocean's depths, it also generates novel aesthetic practices. From the programming of hydrophones to target specific frequencies to interpreting the visual representations of captured acoustic signals, surveilling the ocean is now largely a matter of learning to read the ocean as it is sensed by machines.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1092-311X
Print ISSN
2572-6633
Pages
pp. 891-910
Launched on MUSE
2019-10-23
Open Access
No
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