Abstract

Abstract:

This article focuses on the language used to describe the plague, and more specifically on the oscillation of its vocabulary between literal and figurative meaning, in Homer's Iliad (1.1–487), Sophocles' Oedipus the King (1–215), and Thucydides' History of the Peloponnesian War (esp. 2.47.3–2.54). It is argued that the plague spreads in the language of the three narratives by association or contiguity, exploiting existing links with related words, most notably the broader vocabulary of disease and calamity, but it also spreads by analogy, comparison, or similarity, establishing links with other domains such as famine, blight, war and destruction.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1086-3168
Print ISSN
0002-9475
Pages
pp. 381-414
Launched on MUSE
2019-10-12
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.