In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:

  • Public Participation in Air Sampling and Water Quality Test Kit Development to Enable Citizen Science
  • Erin N. Haynes, DrPH MS, Timothy J. Hilbert, MS, Rusty Roberts, John Quirolgico, MS, Rachael Shepler, Gerry Beckner, Jennifer Veevers, PhD, Jeff Burkle, and Roman Jandarov, PhD

What Is the Purpose of This Study/Review?

• To establish an academic–community partnership to address Guernsey County residents' concern regarding environmental quality near proposed and operating natural gas extraction waste sites.

• To develop a citizen science tool for water quality assessment by engagement of the local middle and high schools.

What Is the Problem?

• Natural gas extraction creates liquid, solid, and gaseous waste and the management of these wastes is a public health concern.

• Natural gas extraction waste facilities are often located in underserved areas, an environmental justice issue for these communities.

• The dramatic increase in natural gas extraction activity has caused concern among community members of Guernsey County and neighboring counties.

What Are the Findings?

• Together we selected 10 air sampling locations in proximity to current or proposed natural gas extraction sites, obtained cooperation from landowners, and conducted air quality monitoring over a 6-week period.

• Volatile organic compounds were detected at all 10 air sampling locations.

• Nineteen unique volatile organic compounds were detected; one was above the recommended exposure level.

• Water quality test kits were developed and piloted in middle school and high school classrooms.

Who Should Care Most?

• Residents, public health officials, and emergency responders in rural communities with nearby natural gas extraction activity.

• Educators and residents with an interest in participating in environmental health research via citizen science. [End Page 123]

Recommendations for Action

• Baseline measurements should be taken at any potential natural gas extraction sites and routine monitoring be conducted thereafter to characterize long-term exposures.

• Water and soil sampling should be performed.

• Data such as truck traffic and gallons of waste injected should be documented.

• Engaging residents in research is a useful tool for increasing awareness and connecting communities to research. [End Page 124]

Erin N. Haynes
Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, University of Kentucky
Timothy J. Hilbert
Department of Environmental Health, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati
Rusty Roberts
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
John Quirolgico
Department of Environmental Health, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati
Rachael Shepler
Guernsey County resident
Gerry Beckner
Guernsey County Department of Emergency Management
Jennifer Veevers
Department of Environmental Health, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati
Jeff Burkle
Guernsey County resident
Roman Jandarov
Department of Environmental Health, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati
Correspondence to: Erin N. Haynes, DrPH MS, Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, University of Kentucky, 111 Washington Ave., CPH 212G, Lexington, KY 40536-0003. Phone: (859) 562-2119. Fax: (859) 257-8811. E-mail: Erin.Haynes@uky.edu
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Additional Information

ISSN
1557-055X
Print ISSN
1557-0541
Pages
pp. 123-124
Launched on MUSE
2019-06-04
Open Access
No
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