Abstract

abstract:

This article examines George Noyes Miller's The Strike of a Sex (1891) and Annie Denton Cridge's Man's Rights (1870) as dystopias attempting to depict the ideal of human equality achieved through cross-gender solidarity. The novels' inconsistencies are seen as resulting from an erosion of generic patterns, rhetorical strategies, and stereotypical characterizations as the authors seek to express new sentiments in a cultural ambience still governed by binary thinking and well-established beliefs. The result of the juxtaposition of the fossilized conventions and advanced, idealistic approaches produces a rudimentary form of dialogism where crucial roles are played by the imagery of separate spheres and the concept of boundary crossing, while the notion of cross-gender solidarity becomes the textual dominant of both works.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2154-9648
Print ISSN
1045-991X
Pages
pp. 176-196
Launched on MUSE
2018-07-11
Open Access
No
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