Abstract

Abstract:

In Against the Greeks, Tatian develops a cultural critique by placing himself, his Greek education, and his "barbarian" ethnicity within the scope of the text's argument. I argue that this constitutes a deliberate strategy in which Tatian embodied a cultural monster—a hybrid creature that reflected both the mainstream of Greek paideutic values and the barbarian cultures that were antithetical to them—in order to secure a self-identity for himself and the early Christian communities for whom he presumed to speak. By performing his monstrosity in this way, he makes the case that Greek paideia is not a pure inheritance from a monolithic cultural tradition. Instead, Tatian posits a cultural theory that reflects his own hybrid self.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-3184
Print ISSN
1067-6341
Pages
pp. 191-219
Launched on MUSE
2018-07-04
Open Access
No
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