Abstract

Abstract:

In 1968 students and faculty at Yale University protested against plans for a new underground library. The protests reflected and refracted increased student and faculty campus activism, anxieties generated by urban renewal projects in New Haven, and concerns about the university's place in the city. This study challenges the assumption that the academic library was a passive spectator to events on campuses during the 1960s and analyzes how factors like changing space needs, the growth of published information, evolving information technologies, and campus activism impacted library planning and design at one of the country's largest academic libraries.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2166-3033
Print ISSN
2164-8034
Pages
pp. 153-174
Launched on MUSE
2018-04-13
Open Access
No
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