Abstract

ABSTRACT:

This article considers women's contributions to the work of linguistic purification through their enforcement of the "telephone voice," a strict method of articulation taught to switchboard operators. Situating George Bernard Shaw's Pygmalion and Village Wooing in their technological climate, it argues that these plays imagine the new experience women might have with language in a telephonic world while also searching out a mode of acoustic inscription modeled on the telephone voice that might narrow the gap between script and performance.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1534-7303
Print ISSN
0040-4691
Pages
pp. 32-55
Launched on MUSE
2018-02-24
Open Access
No
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