Abstract

This article examines the relationship between eighteenth-century ideologies of property rights and imperial authority in James Grainger’s The Sugar-Cane (1764). Placing Grainger into dialogue with Joshua Steele, a Barbadian planter and partial critic of existing Caribbean slavery, the article shows how Grainger’s poem seeks to articulate planters’ property rights in sweeping fashion in order to render the scope of imperial authority as expansive as possible. The fact that The Sugar-Cane is unable to fully suppress Atlantic slavery’s terrible realities registers anxieties not only about empire itself but also about the nature and meaning of property in the colonies.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1086-315X
Print ISSN
0013-2586
Pages
pp. 401-416
Launched on MUSE
2017-07-10
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.