Abstract

ABSTRACT:

Previous scholarship on United States human rights policymaking has omitted or vaguely summarized the State Department’s role during World War II. However, this scholarship ignores real policy roots that began with President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms address. As FDR and officials at Foggy Bottom articulated a sweeping postwar vision, bureaucrats drafted bills of rights that encapsulated the conservative assumptions that guided policymakers after the war. These civil servants rejected international enforcement, accepted only rights contained in the United States Constitution, and safeguarded domestic racial discrimination. These ironic assumptions soon caused friction with European allies, Latin American neighbors, and Cold War enemies.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1085-794X
Print ISSN
0275-0392
Pages
pp. 142-161
Launched on MUSE
2017-02-08
Open Access
No
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