Abstract

This article examines the convergence, at the end of the nineteenth century, of a disciplinary confrontation between medicine and psychology on the subject of internal language, and the publication of the first internal monologue, Édouard Dujardin’s Les lauriers sont coupés (1888). When attempting to describe the nature of internal language, doctors and psychologists identified traits that coincide with the poetics of the internal monologue. The increasing hegemony of medicine conferred an epistemological primacy to the brain, to the detriment of the mind, while the internal monologue marked the advent of a literary representation of the life of the mind which broke with the tradition of psychological analysis.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1931-0234
Print ISSN
0014-0767
Pages
pp. 118-131
Launched on MUSE
2017-01-24
Open Access
No
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