Abstract

This essay argues that James represents nascent secular forms for ethically consequential mortuary and mourning practices in an age of death’s modernization. With a focus on “The Altar of the Dead” and, more briefly, passages from other middle and late fictions, this essay considers James’s secular ways of imagining relations between the living and dead, as these relations reach an ethical impasse in modernizing cultures. In evoking the possibility of renovating these posthumous relations, James suggests the possibility of a new pragmatics of dying.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6555
Print ISSN
0273-0340
Pages
pp. 207-217
Launched on MUSE
2016-11-23
Open Access
No
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