Abstract

The purpose of the study was to identify relationships among psychosocial indicators and exposure to hypersexualized rap imagery. African American female college students (N=112) indicated time spent viewing and listening to rap music, identified their attitudes and perceptions of rap music, and responded to measures of self-esteem, cultural identity, and body image. Participants who experienced excessive exposure exhibited more positive empowerment scores than participants who experienced minimal exposure. Respondents with minimal exposure exhibited less positive artistic/esthetic scores than those with moderate exposure. Participants with more positive violence/misogyny scores exhibited lower self-ideal. Implications for promoting healthy relationships are explored.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2376-7510
Print ISSN
2334-2668
Pages
pp. 67-90
Launched on MUSE
2016-03-16
Open Access
No
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