Abstract

Lois Weber’s episodic feature film Hypocrites (1915) poses a challenge to one principle that is thought to have guided American cinema toward classical narrative: the self-effacement of narrative discourse. Weber’s film, and its critical and financial success in a year of such proto-classical landmarks as DeMille’s The Cheat and Griffith’s The Birth of a Nation, reveals the viability, however brief, of a reflexive, allegorical model for the feature-length film during the transition to classical form.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2578-4919
Print ISSN
2578-4900
Pages
pp. 95-119
Launched on MUSE
2015-10-18
Open Access
No
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