Abstract

This essay situates the Dartmouth Brut within the manuscript culture of mid- to late fifteenth-century England. After a brief sketch of the manuscript’s modern ownership, the author turns to the original owners, the Ewre family of County Durham, and then to a recently discovered Brut with some ownership associations with the Dartmouth Brut. Finally, the author compares the competently written Dartmouth manuscript with one of the physically sloppiest of all Brut manuscripts—Glasgow MS Hunter 443. These manuscripts provide useful foils to each other when examined against the large body of Brut manuscripts, illuminating the different methods available to fifteenth-century scribes.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
2162-9552
Print ISSN
2162-9544
Pages
pp. 215-239
Launched on MUSE
2014-12-29
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.