Abstract

A prominent post-Soviet discourse on imidzh (image) advocates close attention to self-presentation as a means of reaching personal goals. Based on fieldwork in a St. Petersburg secretarial school, this article describes how discussions of secretarial imidzh countered anxieties about Russia’s “wild” version of neoliberal capitalism with a gendered morality that valorized “civilized” styles of market interaction. Rather than equating morality and resistance, I argue that people often work to endow capitalist practices with moral grounding. In particular, metapragmatic language about appropriate self-presentation and interaction styles is a key site for constituting moral relationships to capitalism.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1534-1518
Print ISSN
0003-5491
Pages
pp. 725-758
Launched on MUSE
2013-08-23
Open Access
No
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