Abstract

The assumption that developments in technologies and societies create new ethical issues for health and medical research is intuitively appealing. However, a closer inspection of the history of bioethics reveals a surprising consistency in the core issues that have formed the basis of bioethical debates over time. If the issues involved in bioethical debates remain essentially constant, are new discussions and new guidelines and principles—produced in the wake of research scandals or inspired by the introduction of new technologies—redundant? This article examines some of the implications of the history of bioethics for understanding current ethical debates and for the formation of a culture of ethical conduct in health research.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1529-8795
Print ISSN
0031-5982
Pages
pp. 329-338
Launched on MUSE
2012-11-25
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.