Abstract

Established in 1915, Educational Pictures was the industry leader in short subject distribution by the late silent era, dominating the market in two-reel slapstick films. Yet by the mid-1930s the company's reputation had sunk precipitously, and Educational failed to survive the decade. This paper examines that history as a vantage point for reassessing traditional accounts of slapstick's sound-era decline, showing how slapstick cinema's dwindling industrial status was tied to upheavals in the short-subject market and growing cultural divisions within Depression-era America.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1553-3905
Print ISSN
0892-2160
Pages
pp. 313-330
Launched on MUSE
2011-10-05
Open Access
No
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