Abstract

A comparison of the responses of Korea and Taiwan to Japanese colonization during the early years of the twentieth century does much to clarify the distinctiveness of the Korean reaction to Japanese rule. The presence and strength of structural bases for ethnic autonomy in Korea, at least through 1919, encouraged the survival of an indigenous racial identity, despite the imposition of colonial structures. This survival reflected a history of political and economic autonomy in Korea, and was central to the subsequent evolution of Korean nationalism.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1529-1529
Print ISSN
0145-840X
Pages
pp. 54-68
Launched on MUSE
2011-03-30
Open Access
No
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