Abstract

Deuteronomy 21:10–14, identified in the scholarly world as the "captive woman" law and in the rabbinic tradition as the "pretty woman" law, regulates the treatment of foreign women captured in battle by Israelite fighters. Medieval Jewish biblical exegetes anticipated contemporary notions of rape as a violent assertion of power and domination rather than a manifestation of sexuality or eroticism, as well as Sigmund Freud's interpretation of sexual anxiety dreams. Power is the key to the perception of the theological dangers of rape on the battlefield; it is the climax of an incontrollable urge to become God rather than to imitate Him.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1527-2028
Print ISSN
0021-6704
Pages
pp. 61-85
Launched on MUSE
2008-07-25
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.