Abstract

This essay explores how Sidney's romance—particularly the narrative of Plangus and Erona—engages with the Elizabethan debate on idolatry and reflects the facts of Elizabethan iconoclasm to reveal a much more sympathetic attitude toward the relationship between art and religious worship than Sidney's reputation as a Protestant might suggest. Fundamental to this paradox is Cupid. The essay begins by tracing Sidney's encounter with the love god through Italian painting before considering Cupid's notoriety as a figure for pagan and Catholic idolatry and, finally, his spectacular revenge against the iconoclast in the Arcadia.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1522-9270
Print ISSN
0039-3657
Pages
pp. 65-91
Launched on MUSE
2008-02-25
Open Access
No
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