Abstract

This essay considers Thomas Dekker's The Shoemaker's Holiday as a history play rather than as a comedy, and so seeks to situate it among other works from the late-Elizabethan area that focus on the lives and actions of what can be broadly termed the "middling sort." I argue that the part of the play devoted to the rise of Simon Eyre to the office of Lord Mayor of London seeks to historicize the city and its citizens, a narrative effect that is reinforced through the physical dynamics of performing London history on the edges of London itself.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1522-9270
Print ISSN
0039-3657
Pages
pp. 323-348
Launched on MUSE
2006-05-18
Open Access
No
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