Abstract

Survey data from a southwestern metropolitan area are used to analyze whether the ability of personal Christian religiosity to predict social conformity is spuriously due to self-control. Results indicate that both personal religiosity and self-control display statistically significant, independent negative net relationships with many forms of projected misbehavior. And interaction between self-control and religiosity in predicting deviance appears to be limited. Thus, self-control does not seem to account for the effects of religiosity, leaving the issue of how and why religiosity leads to conformity unresolved.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1534-7605
Print ISSN
0037-7732
Pages
pp. 1605-1623
Launched on MUSE
2006-04-24
Open Access
No
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