Abstract

The Women's Peace Camp at Greenham in Newbury, England, survived almost twenty years, from 1981 until 2000, as an extended protest against the placement of nuclear missiles on British soil and provided an innovative and generative space of feminist rhetorical invention. This essay provides an analysis of their evolving protest actions. It looks specifically at the types of feminist rhetorical invention employed—including feminist coding strategies, use of women's bodies as rhetorical topos, and the use of Background symbolism, affirming symbols of women's lives—to create a women-centered community and challenge the patriarchal traditions and symbols that the nuclear missiles represented.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2151-7371
Print ISSN
2151-7363
Pages
pp. 18-41
Launched on MUSE
2004-11-15
Open Access
No
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