Abstract

In his courtroom speech Against Eratosthenes, Lysias calls for revenge against the murderers of his brother Polemarchus. In Plato's Republic, however, Socrates convinces Polemarchus, in the presence of Lysias, that harming enemies is unjust. Socrates' argument focuses on certain problems and assumptions that turn out to be key features of Lysias' indictment of Eratosthenes. I argue that Socrates' conversation with Polemarchus is on one level a Platonic reply to Against Eratosthenes and that Plato's implicit criticisms of Lysias in the Republic harmonize with the picture of Lysias that he inscribes explicitly in the Phaedrus.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-3168
Print ISSN
0002-9475
Pages
pp. 179-208
Launched on MUSE
2004-06-25
Open Access
No
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