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Area and Ethnic Studies > Russian and East European Studies

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Prodigal Son Cover

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Prodigal Son

Vasilii Shuksin in Soviet Russian Culture

Givens, John

The Prose of Life Cover

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The Prose of Life

Russian Women Writers from Khrushchev to Putin

Benjamin M. Sutcliffe

Both before and after the collapse of the Soviet Union, everyday life and the domestic sphere served as an ideological battleground, simultaneously threatening Stalinist control and challenging traditional Russian gender norms that had been shaken by the Second World War. The Prose of Life examines how six female authors employed images of daily life to depict women’s experience in Russian culture from the 1960s to the present. Byt, a term connoting both the everyday and its many petty problems, is an enduring yet neglected theme in Russian literature: its very ordinariness causes many critics to ignore it. Benjamin Sutcliffe’s study is the first sustained examination of how and why everyday life as a literary and philosophical category catalyzed the development of post-Stalinist Russian women’s prose, particularly since the collapse of the Soviet Union.
    A focus on the representation of everyday life in women’s prose reveals that a first generation of female writers (Natal’ia Baranskaia, Irina Grekova) both legitimated and limited their successors (Liudmila Petrushevskaia, Tat’iana Tolstaia, Liudmila Ulitskaia, and Svetlana Vasilenko) in their choice of literary topics. The Prose of Life traces the development, and intriguing ruptures, of recent Russian women’s prose, becoming a must-read for readers interested in Russian literature and gender studies.

2009 Outstanding Academic Title, Choice Magazine

The Pushkin Handbook Cover

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The Pushkin Handbook

Edited by David M. Bethea

The Pushkin Handbook, a collection of studies by leading Pushkin scholars from the former Soviet Union, North America, and elsewhere, unites in one volume a multiplicity of voices engaged in a genuinely post-Soviet dialogue. From its beginnings, Pushkin’s oeuvre has accommodated numerous, often competing readings. This book is further testimony to the continuing complexity of Russia’s preeminent writer: his place in the literary and cultural cosmos, his relationship to his Russian predecessors and contemporaries, and his reception and interpretation at various points in history.

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Pushkin Review

Vol. 14 (2011) through current issue

The Pushkin Review is a bi-lingual, peer-reviewed journal published annually in print and online by the North American Pushkin Society, in cooperation with the International Pushkin Society. The journal features new scholarly articles, translations of Pushkin, reprints of hard-to-obtain Pushkiniana, and book reviews.

Pushkin’s Rhyming Cover

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Pushkin’s Rhyming

A Comparative Study

J. Thomas Shaw

The culmination of four decades of work by J. Thomas Shaw, this fully searchable e-book carefully analyzes, both chronologically and by genre, Alexander Pushkin’s use of rhyme to show how meaning shifts in tandem with formal changes. Comparing Pushkin’s poetry with that of Konstantin Nikolaevich Batiushkov (1787–1855) and Evgeny Abramovich Baratynsky (1800–1844), Shaw considers, among other topics, what is exact and inexact in “exact” rhyme, how the grammatical characteristics of rhymewords affect the reader’s percepetion of the poem and its rhyme, and how the repetition of a rhyming word can also change meaning.
    Each of the five chapters analyzes in detail a distinct aspect of rhyme and provides rich resources for future scholars in the accompanying tables of data. The extensive back matter in the book includes a glossary, abbreviations list, bibliography, and indexes of poems cited, names, and rhyme types and analyses.

Realizing Metaphors Cover

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Realizing Metaphors

Alexander Pushkin and the Life of the Poet

David M. Bethea

    Readers often have regarded with curiosity the creative life of the poet. In this passionate and authoritative new study, David Bethea illustrates the relation between the art and life of nineteenth-century poet Alexander Pushkin, the central figure in Russian thought and culture. Bethea shows how Pushkin, on the eve of his two-hundredth birthday, still speaks to our time. He indicates how we as modern readers might "realize"— that is, not only grasp cognitively, but feel, experience—the promethean metaphors central to the poet's intensely "sculpted" life. The Pushkin who emerges from Bethea's portrait is one who, long unknown to English-language readers, closely resembles the original both psychologically and artistically.
    Bethea begins by addressing the influential thinkers Freud, Bloom, Jakobson, and Lotman to show that their premises do not, by themselves, adequately account for Pushkin's psychology of creation or his version of the "life of the poet." He then proposes his own versatile model of reading, and goes on to sketches the tangled connections between Pushkin and his great compatriot, the eighteenth-century poet Gavrila Derzhavin. Pushkin simultaneously advanced toward and retreated from the shadow of his predecessor as he created notions of poet-in-history and inspiration new for his time and absolutely determinative for the tradition thereafter.

Redemption and the Merchant God Cover

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Redemption and the Merchant God

Dostoevsky’s Economy of Salvation and Antisemitism

McReynolds, Susan

Dostoevsky’s Russian chauvinism and anti Semitism have long posed problems for his readers and critics. How could the author of The Brothers Karamazov also be the source of the slurs against Jews in Diary of a Writer? And where is the celebrated Christian humanist in the nationalist outbursts of The Idiot? These enigmas—the coexistence of humanism and hatred, faith and doubt—are linked, Susan McReynolds tells us in Redemption and the Merchant God. Her book analyzes Dostoevsky’s novels and Diary to show how the author’s anxieties about Christianity can help solve the riddle of his anti Semitism as well as that of his Russian messianism.

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Region: Regional Studies of Russia, Eastern Europe, and Central Asia

Vol. 1 (2012) through current issue

Region is a peer-reviewed international journal that explores the history and current political, economic, and social affairs of the entire former Soviet bloc. In particular, the journal focuses on various facets of transformation at the local and national levels in the aforementioned regions, as well as the changing character of their relationships with the rest of the world in the context of globalization, a perspective that stresses both local adaptation to global phenomena and that adaptation’s transnational or even global significance.

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Reinventing Romantic Poetry

Russian Women Poets of the Mid-Nineteenth Century

Diana Greene

Reinventing Romantic Poetry offers a new look at the Russian literary scene in the nineteenth century. While celebrated poets such as Aleksandr Pushkin worked within a male-centered Romantic aesthetic—the poet as a bard or sexual conqueror; nature as a mother or mistress; the poet’s muse as an idealized woman—Russian women attempting to write Romantic poetry found they had to reinvent poetic conventions of the day to express themselves as women and as poets. Comparing the poetry of fourteen men and fourteen women from this period, Diana Greene revives and redefines the women’s writings and offers a thoughtful examination of the sexual politics of reception and literary reputation.
The fourteen women considered wrote poetry in every genre, from visions to verse tales, from love lyrics to metaphysical poetry, as well as prose works and plays. Greene delves into the reasons why their writing was dismissed, focusing in particular on the work of Evdokiia Rostopchina, Nadezhda Khvoshchinskaia, and Karolina Pavlova. Greene also considers class as a factor in literary reputation, comparing canonical male poets with the work of other men whose work, like the women’s, was deemed inferior at the time. The book also features an appendix of significant poems by Russian women discussed in the text. Some, found in archival notebooks, are published here for the first time, and others are reprinted for the first time since the mid-nineteenth century.

Re-mapping Polish-German Historical Memory Cover

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Re-mapping Polish-German Historical Memory

Physical, Political, and Literary Spaces since World War II

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