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Area and Ethnic Studies > Iberian Studies

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Prostituidas por el texto Cover

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Prostituidas por el texto

Discurso prostibulario en la picaresca femenina

by Enriqueta Zafra

Zafra considers legal measures and moral treatises that define the boundaries of sin. Her analysis discusses the lesser evil that the presence of prostitutes represents for society, as well as, the concern for the public good that led to its legal eradication in 1623. Zafra's research demonstrates that the discourse on early modern prostitution present in literary and extra-literary sources informs us of more than the sexual practices allowed to prostitutes, and therefore, is part of a larger discourse on the regulation of women's behavior. She points out that moralists, preachers, legislators, and writers participated in this on-going discourse on prostitution, women, and sex.

Radical Theatricality Cover

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Radical Theatricality

Jongleuresque Performance on the Early Spanish Stage

by Bruce R. Burningham

Radical Theatricality argues that our narrow search for extant medieval play scripts depends entirely on a definition of theater far more literary than performative. This literary definition pushes aside some of our best evidence of Spain's medieval performance traditions precisely because this evidence is considered either intangible or "un-dramatic" (that is, monologic).

Raised to Rule Cover

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Raised to Rule

Educating Royalty at the Court of the Spanish Habsburgs, 1601-1634

Martha K. Hoffman

The children of Philip III of Spain (1578–1621) and Margarita de Austria (1584–1611) inherited great potential power: the abilities to declare war or make peace, to advocate religious doctrine, and to exert lasting influence over art, culture, and taste. The leadership provided by this generation raises the question of how royal families learned the roles they played in court, country, and on the international stage. In Raised to Rule, Hoffman presents a deeply researched and stimulating study of the formative experiences of children in the royal households of early modern Spain. Five of the eight children born to the royal couple survived to adulthood: the future king Philip IV; the future queen regent of France, Anne of Austria; the Cardinal-Infante Fernando, who rose to international fame as a general during the Thirty Years’ War; the future Empress María, briefly known as the princess of England during Charles Stuart’s 1623 pursuit of a “Spanish match”; and the Infante Carlos, the constant companion of Philip IV and his heir-presumptive for nearly a decade, who was named governor of Portugal but died before he could serve. Hoffman elucidates the formal instruction and informal training that prepared these individuals to shape the history of their country and influence all of Europe. For the heirs of Philip and Margarita, developmental experiences took place within the social structures and patronage systems of the royal court—a place that proved to be influential and precarious, where public and private relationships overlapped and political metaphors of family relationships reflected the reality of public service based on personal ties. Drawing on a wide variety of sources, including palace rulebooks, chronicles, household accounts, a journal of the royal chapel, diplomatic and personal correspondence, published and unpublished advice to kings, and treatises on the education of princes, Hoffman illustrates the formation of the leadership of Spain and early modern perceptions of the proper education and function of royalty. Hoffman’s Raised to Rule provides an insightful account of the education of the Spanish Habsburgs from 1601 to 1634. Her work fills a significant historiographical gap and offers new revelations into a previously neglected aspect of royal life.

Republic of Egos Cover

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Republic of Egos

A Social History of the Spanish Civil War

Michael Seidman

Most histories of the Spanish Civil War (1936–1939) have examined major leaders or well-established political and social groups to explore class, gender, and ideological struggles. The war in Spain was marked by momentous conflicts between democracy and dictatorship, Communism and fascism, anarchism and authoritarianism, and Catholicism and anticlericalism that still provoke our fascination.
    In Republic of Egos, Michael Seidman focuses instead on the personal and individual experiences of the common men and women who were actors in a struggle that defined a generation and helped to shape our world. By examining the roles of anonymous individuals, families, and small groups who fought for their own interests and survival—and not necessarily for an abstract or revolutionary cause—Seidman reveals a powerful but rarely considered pressure on the outcome of history. He shows how price controls and inflation in the Republican zone encouraged peasant hoarding, black marketing, and unrest among urban workers. Soldiers of the Republican Army responded to material shortages by looting, deserting, and fraternizing with the enemy. Seidman’s focus on average, seemingly nonpolitical individuals provides a new vision of both the experience and outcome of the war.

The Return of the Moor Cover

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The Return of the Moor

Spanish Responses to Contemporary Moroccan Immigration

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The Return of the Moor examines the anxiety over symbolic and literal boundaries permeating the Spanish reception of these immigrants through an interdisciplinary analysis of social, fictional and performative texts. It argues that Moroccans constitute a “problem” to Spaniards not because of their cultural differences, as many claim, but because they are not different enough.

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Revista de Estudios Hispánicos

Vol. 46 (2012) through current issue

The Revista de Estudios Hispánicos an internationally recognized, peer-reviewed journal that publishes original manuscripts in all areas of Hispanic literatures, cultures, and film, including essays on theoretical and interdisciplinary topics.

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Revista Hispánica Moderna

Vol. 60 (2007) through current issue

Founded in 1934 as Boletín del Instituto de las Españas at Columbia University, Revista Hispánica Moderna has been regarded since as one of the most distinguished international venues for academic research in Spanish. RHM is a semiannual peer-reviewed journal committed to the dissemination of outstanding scholarship on Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian literary and cultural studies. It publishes essays and book reviews in Spanish, English, or Portuguese on the full spectrum of Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian cultural production in Europe, Latin America, and the United States, and in all historical periods, from the Middle Ages to the present.

The Rise of Middle-Class Culture in Nineteenth-Century Spain Cover

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The Rise of Middle-Class Culture in Nineteenth-Century Spain

Jesus Cruz

In his stimulating study, Jesus Cruz examines middle-class lifestyles—generally known as bourgeois culture—in nineteenth-century Spain. Cruz argues that the middle class ultimately contributed to Spain’s democratic stability and economic prosperity in the last decades of the twentieth century. Interdisciplinary in scope, Cruz’s work draws upon the methodology of various areas of study—including material culture, consumer studies, and social history—to investigate class. In recent years, scholars in the field of Spanish studies have analyzed disparate elements of modern middle-class milieu, such as leisure and sociability, but Cruz looks at these elements as part of the whole. He traces the contribution of nineteenth-century bourgeois cultures not only to Spanish modernity but to the history of Western modernity more broadly. The Rise of Middle-Class Culture in Nineteenth-Century Spain provides key insights for scholars in the fields of Spanish and European studies, including history, literary studies, art history, historical sociology, and political science.

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Romance Notes

Vol. 47 (2006) through current issue

Romance Notes, a journal that accepts articles on any literary, cultural, or linguistic topic dealing with Romance studies, appears three times a year Articles, or “notes” as they are called, can be written in any Romance language and in English and should not exceed 3,000 words. Romance Notes was founded in 1959 by Professor U. T. Holmes, Jr., and is now led by Professor Monica Rector. It has more than fifty annual volumes published as of 2012.

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