Cover

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Title page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Foreword

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p. ix

Established in 1976, the Calgary Institute for the Humanities has as its aim the fostering of advanced study and research in all areas of the humanities. Apart from supporting work in the traditional "arts" disciplines such as philosophy, history, ancient and modern...

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Editors' Note

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pp. xi-xii

This volume represents the culmination of the efforts that have gone into the organization and staging of the Nickle Conference since September 1979. Sponsored by the Calgary Institute for the Humanities, the Office of the Curator of Numismatics, and the Faculty...

Programme of Conference

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pp. xiii-xiv

Abbreviations

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pp. xv-xvi

Part I: Greek Coinage

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Greek Coinage and War

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pp. 3-18

Everyone living today must know that both actual war and preparation against the eventuality of it are very expensive items indeed in a nation's budget. Yet, because of the economic structure of the modern world, the impact of military expenditure on coinage...

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The "Reduced Euboio-Attic" Coin Weight Standard

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pp. 19-38

In the late sixth century B.C., three cities on the island of Euboia—Karystos, Chalkis, and Eretria—issued large silver coins on a weight standard that scholars naturally take to be the "Euboian" standard of Herodotus 3.89, though they often call it...

Part Ii: Alexander and the Hellenistic East

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The Silver Coinage of Alexander from Pella

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pp. 41-56

This paper presents the results of a die-link study of the silver coinage of Alexander the Great from the mint at Pella.1 The coins taken into consideration were those which Edward Newell, in his publication of the Demanhur hoard2, attributed to that...

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Lysimachus the Gazophylax: A Modern Scholarly Myth?

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pp. 57-68

"Lysimachus was even greedier for money than for territories." Few scholars would dispute E. Cavaignac's grim assessment of Lysimachus,1 ruler of Thrace from 323 to 281 B.C., or A. Andreades' somewhat milder statement2 that "alone of...

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The So-Called "Pedigree Coins" of the Bactrian Greeks

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pp. 69-92

Antimachus and Agathocles are among the many Bactrian kings known solely from their coinage, their reigns roughly contemporary in the second quarter of the second century B.C. In addition to tetradrachms bearing the usual types of standing...

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The Monetary System in the Seleucid Empire after 187 B.C.

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pp. 93-114

In the Seleucid provinces east of the Euphrates river, four mints were operating when Antiochus III died: Nisibis in Mesopotamia, Seleucia on the Tigris in Babylonia, Susa in Susiana, and Ecbatana in Media. All the mints struck silver and bronze coins...

Part III: The Phoenician World

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The Coins of the Phoenician World--East and West

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pp. 117-140

This is one of an on-going series of studies on Phoenician and Punic coinage. The purpose underlying all is to compare the Eastern and Western types in order 1) to identify, date, define, and explain the sacred symbols, conventions, and deities represented...

Part IV: Coins and Propaganda

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Royal Coins and Rome

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pp. 143-158

Everyone recognizes the acuity of hindsight, but its clarity can be specious and historians require wariness. A major case in point for ancient history furnishes the theme of this paper.
In regarding the dominance of Rome over the Near...

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An "Altar" Coin in Heidelberg

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pp. 159-164

Among the coins contained in the collection of the Seminar fur Alte Ceschichte at the University of Heidelberg occur a number of issues that bear the familiar features of the celebrated altar flanked by statues of Victory that stood in the sanctuary...

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Nero's Liberation of Achaea: Some Numismatic Evidence from Patrae

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pp. 165-186

Nero's year-long visit to Greece in A.D. 66 and 67 was one of the earliest state visits undertaken by a Roman emperor, and surely the most bizarre. The ancient sources, almost uniformly hostile, indicate that his chief motive was self-gratification...

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The "Commemorative" Coins of Antoninus Pius Re-Examined

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pp. 187-200

In an article from 1925, Jocelyn Toynbee discusses a series of bronze medallions with obverse portraits of either Antoninus Pius or his wife, Faustina, and with reverses commemorating scenes from Rome's distant past.1 The author correctly points out...

Part V: Coins and Archaeology

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A Coin Copy of Lysippus's Heracles at Tarentum

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pp. 203-220

Two quarter-staters in the Bibliotheque Nationale (figs. 1-2) are the only preserved gold coins from Heraclea Lucaniae.1 The obverses2 and reverses were struck from the same pair of dies. The obverses show a head of Athena facing left. The goddess...

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Foreign Currency in Etruria circa 400-200 B.C.: Distribution Patterns

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pp. 221-240

The movement of coinage throughout ancient Etruria both before and after the Roman conquest in the first half of the third century B.C. has never been systematically investigated. Although some attention has been paid to the geographic distribution...

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Art and Architecture as Severan Coin Types

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pp. 241-260

Public galleries, displaying sculptures and paintings, and openair museums were something of a commonplace in Rome by Severan times (A.D. 193-235).1 The practice originated during the expansionist years and wars of the Republic during...

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Caesarea Maritima in Late Antiquity: An Introduction to the Numismatic Evidence

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pp. 261-286

From its foundation to its demise, Caesarea Maritima played a premier role in the history of the Levant.1 This metropolis, which was to serve as the Roman and Byzantine capital of Palestine for over six hundred years, was founded by Herod the Great...

Part Vi: Abstracts

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pp. 287-298

Plates and Figures

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pp. 299-310