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This issue contains 39 articles in total

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  1. Remembering a Son of the Midwest: Ellis Hawley, 1929–2020
  2. The Latina/o Midwest Reader by Omar S. Valerio-Jiménez (review)
  3. Hinterland: America's New Landscape of Class and Conflict by Phil A. Neel (review)
  4. The Dawn of Detroit: A Chronicle of Slavery and Freedom in the City of the Straits by Tiya Miles (review)
  5. From Hometown to Battlefield in the Civil War Era: Middle Class Life in Midwest America by Timothy R. Mahoney (review)
  6. Publisher for the Masses: Emanuel Haldeman-Julius by R. Alton Lee (review)
  7. Reimagining Environmental History: Ecological Memory in the Wake of Landscape Change by Christian Knoeller (review)
  8. Big Sister: Feminism, Conservatism, and Conspiracy in the Heartland by Erin M. Kempker (review)
  9. Flames of Discontent: The 1916 Minnesota Iron Ore Strike by Gary Kaunonen (review)
  10. The Fall of Wisconsin: The Conservative Conquest of a Progressive Bastion and the Future of American Politics by Dan Kaufman (review)
  11. The Heartland: An American History by Kristin L. Hoganson (review)
  12. Unsettling the West: Violence and State Building in the Ohio Valley by Rob Harper (review)
  13. Benevolence, Moral Reform, Equality: Women's Activism in Kansas City, 1870 to 1940 by K. David Hanzlick (review)
  14. Hairs vs. Squares: The Mustache Gang, the Big Red Machine, and the Tumultuous Summer of '72 by Ed Gruver (review)
  15. Crusader for Democracy: The Political Life of William Allen White by Charles Delgadillo (review)
  16. The American Farmer in the Eighteenth Century: A Social and Cultural History by Richard Lyman Bushman (review)
  17. Mid-Michigan Modern: From Frank Lloyd Wright to Googie by Susan J. Bandes (review)
  18. "From Such Beginnings, Much May Be Expected"
  19. America's Republican Refounding: David McCullough's Paean to Pioneers in the Old Northwest
  20. A Gentle Remembering: David McCullough's The Pioneers
  21. McCullough's Critics Offer a Narrow View of History
  22. The Public's Historian
  23. The Wrong History for Our Time: An Analysis of David McCullough's The Pioneers
  24. Were They Really Pioneers?
  25. Holding the Soil: A Note on the Conservation of Midwesternness
  26. If You Believe You Exist: On Bon Iver, Midwestern Literature and Art, and a Tradition, of Sorts
  27. The Monolith: Thoughts on Growing up Jewtheran in the Rural Midwest
  28. Charlotte Ouisconsin Van Cleve and Telling Midwestern Regional Stories
  29. Regional Identity, Immigration, and Religious Community in the Nineteenth Century: Dutch Colonies, Church Conflicts, and Religious Influences on Regional Consciousness
  30. "Splendid and Remarkable Progress" in the Midwest: Assessing the Emergence and Social Impact of Regional Art Museums, 1875–1925
  31. It is Time to Rethink Regionalism in Midwestern Life: How Two National Magazines Caricatured a Midwestern Art Movement and Hid Its Critical and Community-Engaged Edge
  32. Reading Regionalism in the Midwest: Evidence from "What Middletown Read" Data
  33. African American, African Indian, and Midwestern
  34. "The Brightest Star under the Blue Dome of Heaven": Civil Rights and Midwestern Black Identity in Iowa, 1839–1900
  35. Making Midwestern Art History: Oskar Hagen and James Watrous
  36. The Imagined Midwest
  37. The Midwest and the Rise of American Regionalism, 1890–1915
  38. Midwestern Regionalism: Place, Time, and Perspective
  39. Introduction: Middle West Review and the Middle Ground
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