Preface

  1. Women, Book History, and the Long Eighteenth Century: Taking Stock, Moving Forward
  2. Betty A. Schellenberg, Michelle Levy
  3. pp. 1-3
  4. DOI: 10.1353/hlq.2021.0000
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Introduction

  1. Invisible Women, 1983–2021
  2. Margaret J. M. Ezell
  3. pp. 5-12
  4. DOI: 10.1353/hlq.2021.0001
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Section 1: Theorizing Women’s Book History as Feminist Practice

  1. Restoring Authority for Women Writers: Name Authority Records as Digital Recovery Scholarship
  2. Kirstyn Leuner
  3. pp. 13-26
  4. DOI: 10.1353/hlq.2021.0002
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  1. Revising the Professional Woman Writer: Mary Wollstonecraft and Precarious Income
  2. E. J. Clery
  3. pp. 27-38
  4. DOI: 10.1353/hlq.2021.0003
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  1. Dorothy Wordsworth's Decomposing Compositions: Preservation, Loss, and the Remediation of the Modern Manuscript
  2. Kandice Sharren
  3. pp. 39-52
  4. DOI: 10.1353/hlq.2021.0004
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Response to Section 1

  1. Naming and Narratives of Authorship in Women's Book History
  2. E. J. Clery, Kirstyn Leuner, Kandice Sharren
  3. pp. 53-54
  4. DOI: 10.1353/hlq.2021.0005
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Section 2: Reading Women as Manuscript Authors and as Editors

  1. "Rummaging, Sorting, Selecting, Preserving or Destroying": Frances Burney d'Arblay as Editor
  2. Peter Sabor
  3. pp. 55-64
  4. DOI: 10.1353/hlq.2021.0006
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  1. Eliza Fletcher's Private Authorship
  2. Pam Perkins
  3. pp. 65-73
  4. DOI: 10.1353/hlq.2021.0007
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  1. Manuscript Fiction and the Survival of Scribal Practices in the Age of Print
  2. Emily C. Friedman
  3. pp. 75-84
  4. DOI: 10.1353/hlq.2021.0008
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Response to Section 2

  1. Authorial Choice and Modes of Circulation
  2. Emily C. Friedman, Pam Perkins, Peter Sabor
  3. pp. 85-86
  4. DOI: 10.1353/hlq.2021.0009
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Section 3: Reconstructing Women’s Work in the Book Trades and Social Networks

  1. Women's Labor in the Mid-Eighteenth-Century English Literary Economy
  2. Kate Ozment
  3. pp. 87-98
  4. DOI: 10.1353/hlq.2021.0010
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  1. Female Booksellers at the End of the Long Eighteenth Century
  2. Michelle Levy
  3. pp. 99-112
  4. DOI: 10.1353/hlq.2021.0011
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  1. Obscure Women, Obscure Networks, and Women's Book History
  2. Andrew O. Winckles
  3. pp. 113-122
  4. DOI: 10.1353/hlq.2021.0012
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Response to Section 3:

  1. Beyond Authorship: Reconstructing Women's Literary Labor
  2. Michelle Levy, Kate Ozment, Andrew O. Winckles
  3. pp. 123-124
  4. DOI: 10.1353/hlq.2021.0013
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Section 4: Learning to Count: Women Compiling, Collecting, and Owning Books

  1. My Lady's Books: Devising a Tool Kit for Quantitative Research; or, What Is a Book and How Do We Count It?
  2. Marie-Louise Coolahan
  3. pp. 125-137
  4. DOI: 10.1353/hlq.2021.0014
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  1. Women's Book Collecting in the Eighteenth Century: The Libraries of the Countess of Hertford and the Duchess of Northumberland
  2. Melanie Bigold
  3. pp. 139-150
  4. DOI: 10.1353/hlq.2021.0015
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  1. Eighteenth-Century Manuscript Verse Miscellanies and the Print–Manuscript Interface
  2. Betty A. Schellenberg
  3. pp. 151-164
  4. DOI: 10.1353/hlq.2021.0016
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Response to Section 4

  1. Rethinking and Re-viewing Data
  2. Melanie Bigold, Marie-Louise Coolahan, Betty A. Schellenberg
  3. pp. 165-166
  4. DOI: 10.1353/hlq.2021.0017
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Section 5: Practicing an Inclusive Women’s Book History

  1. Pressed and Stitched: Empirical Bibliography and the Gendering of Books and Book History
  2. Cait Coker
  3. pp. 167-175
  4. DOI: 10.1353/hlq.2021.0018
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  1. Women, Oral Culture, and Book History in the Romantic-Era British Archipelago: Charlotte Brooke, Anne Grant, and Felicia Hemans
  2. Leith Davis
  3. pp. 177-188
  4. DOI: 10.1353/hlq.2021.0019
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  1. Critical Pedagogy and Feminist Scholarship in the Archives
  2. Rachael Scarborough King
  3. pp. 189-201
  4. DOI: 10.1353/hlq.2021.0020
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Response to Section 5

  1. Minding the Gap(s)
  2. Cait Coker, Leith Davis, Rachael Scarborough King
  3. pp. 203-204
  4. DOI: 10.1353/hlq.2021.0021
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Conclusion

  1. Hiding in Plain Sight
  2. Michelle Levy, Betty A. Schellenberg
  3. pp. 205-212
  4. DOI: 10.1353/hlq.2021.0022
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